9

Japanese learners of Standard Chinese have both advantages and disadvantages compared to native speakers of other languages. (I will simply write "Chinese" from here on.) According to Hu Xinghua, Many kanji still have have the same shape as the original hanzi. Out of the 2,500 hanzi in Table of Frequently Used Contemporary Chinese Characters, 1,683 ...


7

Muscle memory can certainly be useful but writing them down again and again is really time-consuming and can lead to burnout. Is there any scientific study which supports that method over learning radicals? No... the reverse is actually true. Writing by hand strengthens your memory quite a lot as seen in my other answer related to this. Lots of articles and ...


6

The Japanese Graded Readers published by White Rabbit Japan are available in 5 levels: level 0 corresponds to JLPT N5 (500 字 per story; 350 new words); level 1 corresponds to JLPT N4-5 (400 - 1.500 字 per story; 350 new words); level 2 corresponds to JLPT N4 (1.500 - 2.500 字 per story; 500 new words); level 3 corresponds to JLPT N3-4 (2.500 - 5.000 字 per ...


5

This language school's website has hour estimates for how long it takes a Japanese speaker to learn various other languages based on their internal studies. I've attempted to translate it. The course names are somewhat confusing but they basically boils down to something like learn the minimum level needed when working/living abroad, learn to be able to do ...


5

There are various ways to learn or teach a foreign language. At one end, there is the direct method, and at the other end there are methods such as the bilingual methods and the grammar–translation method. The direct method uses only the target language. This means that you would be learning Japanese using only Japanese (no translations etc. in Chinese and ...


5

(Since this question is just as relevant to Chinese as to Japanese, I will cite a few sources about learning Chinese.) Learning Japanese kanji or Chinese hanzi takes a lot of time. As far as I know, most books and schools start teaching characters from the beginning. However, there are also people who recommend against this. In his video on learning ...


4

I addressed this issue in another question, where I wrote, among other things : In his video on learning foreign alphabets, Olly Richards mentions some (anonymous) learners of Japanese, Chinese and Cantonese who advise not to learn kanji or hanzi at the beginning because it is a lot of work and takes time away from learning to speak. (Also, it is neither ...


3

Sometimes, SRS really does just feel like a chore. I'm definitely not sufficiently consistent with my reviews. However, specifically with Japanese, I have discovered some other ways to improve my vocabulary and kanji reading skills. Note that these items are all items I do now and continue to find useful. I use Anki, typically, but sometimes making ...


3

Keep in mind that reading and listening are, generally speaking, passive learning activities. And while passive learning is better than nothing, Active approaches (speaking, writing in the case of language learning) are much more effective for ANY type of learning, including language learning. That said, I think that ReadLang is a good partial solution for ...


3

To be honest, I think your question cannot be answered properly in its current format. There are too many loosely defined elements in your question. For example, when you say 'learn kanji', what do you mean? Are you talking about a controlled experiment in which participants are given 20 kanji to learn and then have their retention rates tested ...


3

One handy resource is Kana Pict-o-graphix by Michael Rowley (Stone Bridge Press, 1995). This is a pocket-sized book (roughly 7 by 13 cm) containing just 70 pages. It contains a short introduction, followed by 55 pages with mnemonics. The top half of each page presents a mnemonic for a hiragana character; the bottom half presents a mnemonic for a katakana ...


3

Yes it is. However it is hard for Japanese to learn Chinese pronunciation because Japanese and Chinese read same kanji differently, for example Japanese read 中 as "chuu" but Chinese "zhong."


2

Writing new characters two dozen times is what I did when I started learning Chinese. Currently, I use a spaced repetition system (Anki) to review Chinese characters, but instead of just answering question mentally, I write down the character before I check the answer. In addition, I strongly recommend learning kanji in the context of words or sentences ...


1

To add on to the answer already posted by K Man, Genki is a good jumping-off point to guide your studies. I would recommend learning just about everything that the first and second books have to offer. Especially while you're just getting the hang of things, I would recommend you find a native Japanese teacher or at least speaker to help you along if at all ...


1

I took a semester of Japanese in college and we did use the infamous Genki textbook. I would recommend taking your time to learn each chapter's content in depth. If the exercises are not sufficient, do a Google search of each Kanji to learn the vocabulary in context. Find an online language partner to practice the dialogs and questions with and try to make ...


1

I assume your boss was aware you are not fluent in Japanese when hiring you? So can you say "sorry please talk slower, I do not understand"? For speaking, I like Pimsleur audio courses a lot. You listen, get hints, formulate your own answer, and compare it with right answer. They (or others) might be even available in nearby public library. Also consider ...


1

In my experience with Chinese, there is no chicken-and-egg problem here, even though most Chinese words contain more than one character. In the beginning, you will learn many words that consist of just one character, such as 我, 很, 好, 你, 您, 也, 家, 人, 是 and 吗. You will also learn a number of words that consist of two identical characters, e.g. for family ...


1

I can't find any other books like Taeko Kamiya's The Handbook of Japanese Adjectives and Adverbs, at least not in English. There are books with Japanese grammar exercises in English, for example: Modern Japanese Grammar Workbook by Naomi McGloin, M. Endo Hudson, Fumiko Nazikian and Tomomi Kakegawa (Routledge, 2014). Basic Japanese: A Grammar and Workbook ...


1

In terms of efficiency, it is likely better to make the flashcards in conjunction with your L1. In terms of effectiveness of retaining your non-native languages, however, then it would be better to make the flashcards in conjunction with your L2. This technique is called laddering. Here is one of the most popular (non-scientific) laddering articles, and he ...


1

Watashi wa Jen Jen. Congrats on wanting to learn Japanese as a hobby. I, too, have made that decision 5 years ago. During the tsunami that took place awhile back, a lot of Asians moved to Texas after losing their homes. In good spirits, I decided to self-teach Japanese in my spare time. There is a channel on YouTube called JapanSocietyNYC that teaches you ...


1

I would go back even further. Start by concentrating more on learning to comprehend speech than on producing it. Producing too soon sometimes results in habits that have to be unlearned. The more native speech you have heard and understood, the fewer weird syntax you will produce.


1

I apologize to everyone. With respect to Japanese, my earlier answer was absolutely and completely wrong! My first answer was correct, but only for those who discover they want to go beyond what their limited repertoire of traveler-level words, phrases, and sentences will allow them to go. I'm abashed that the very first Japanese language book I ever ...


1

There is no need to learn to learn "Kanji" (logograms) to learn how to speak Japanese. You can easily learn to communicate in Japanese by pronouncing the "Romanji" (Latin alphabet) spellings of Japanese words that you can learn from any number of Romanji English<->Japanese dictionaries, plus by having a basic knowledge of simplified Japanese grammar. But ...


1

It is easier for Japanese to learn Korean. We can deduce this ourselves without resorting to (unfortunately-nonexistent-in-English) academic studies. The deciding factor is the writing system. You said yourself, correctly, that learning the Japanese writing system is far more intense than learning the Korean one. When you take into account the similar ...


1

While the results of this paper aren't explicit in their conclusion with respect to your question, you can infer that if an LFG can be ported from Japanese to Korean with high success, then there must be a high degree of similarity between the two languages (for some definition of high). This is commensurate with the fact that there's a large amount of ...


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