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15

What you need to do is find native speakers (or other people with a near-native level of English) and engage in conversations with them. To make this more concrete: You can look for a so-called "tandem partner", i.e. someone who knows English well and who is interested in learning your language. You can then meet regularly and speak in English for some time ...


15

Three hours/day for 3 years is over 3000 hours. That is a LOT of time, so, YES, you can do it if you take the right approach. You are already well past the beginner stage. But of course you will have to put in a lot of work to achieve your goal. Find a tv series or movie that you really love and are willing to watch many times. Your tv/movie viewing must ...


14

It's never too late to learn a language! And it's especially worthwhile to learn English, seeing that it is the modern world's international language of business and science. I do recommend that you get your son educated in English. As for teaching him yourself, you can teach him the basics and eventually enroll him in some form of professional language ...


14

I will tackle this questions in two steps: first, findings by researchers and teachers, then an alternative approach. Grammar Instruction in Isolation Is Not Effective In 1974, E. Hatch ("Second language learning - universals" in: Working Papers on Bilingualism, 3) made a distinction between "data-gatherers" and "rule-formers". Data-gatherers tend to focus ...


13

First, let them speak English when they switch - but keep speaking the language you're learning confidently. They may switch back to the other language, once they realize you are happy using that language (after all, they may have started speaking English for your benefit, not their own). Other times they may continue to speak English, and you'll have a ...


13

It all depends on the person. I have a student who feels comfortable doing grammatical exercises, as those are reasonably clear-cut, compared to, say, writing or speaking. Grammar exercises are almost always either correct or incorrect, with little middle ground. On the other hand, for some people, they are simply dreary, boring and can be utterly ...


10

If my interpretation of your question as "except for English, what other languages are most often used for communication between people of different nations so that the language used for communication is foreign for all parties", then the answer is the following: In many areas of the world there are other so-called "auxiliary languages" that are used for ...


9

To be entirely honest, I didn't think I could find this one..but I did (I hope so!) On this French eBay page, the vendor is selling a copy of Longman's Indian Readers Primer. II 1948. As you can see above, the book does seem to match of all of your criteria: it is indeed small and thin it is in fact printed by Longman the art style in the book seems to ...


9

Finding such a dictionary in open-source format is unlikely, due to the labor-intensive nature of composing dictionaries. Your two best bets are probably: Wiktionary. You can download the entire Wiktionary. Depending on your precise needs, and scripting skills, you may be able to coerce it into a usable format for your needs. Any sufficiently old ...


9

I suggest that you learn the constructed language called Interslavic. In fact, it would be a service to the community if you learned it well, used it for communication, and then reported the results. Interslavic is a language for communication between Slavs of different nationalities, rooted in centuries of geographical proximity, shared history and ...


8

I'd say that you should study as much grammar as you need to learn the language. For some people, who have little foundation in grammar (in their own language), or who speak a very different language from English such as Chinese, grammar training is important to mastering a new language. For others, who have a good grammatical foundation in a European ...


8

Please check Wikipedia's List of languages by number of native speakers. Mandarin is the biggest language, as expected, followed by Spanish, English (which we exclude for this question), Hindi, Arabic, Portuguese, Bengali, Russian, ... You should not make too many assumptions about the foreign language skills of native speakers of big languages. When you ...


8

There are many varieties of English, not just British English (UK) and "American English" (USA) but also Canadian English, Australian English, New Zealand English, Indian English etcetera. Which variety of English you decide to learn mainly depends on where you live, which variety of English you will need to interact with and the availability of learning ...


7

Based on this wikipedia page, I would say your best shot would be to pick a language based on which country has the smallest number of English speakers, then figure out what the most popular websites/messaging apps in those countries are. For example, this website claims that the most popular messaging app in Russia is WhatsApp. I don't know much about ...


7

Reaching level B1 after learning English for roughly two and a half years is not bad. There are several ways in which you can improve your level and especially your grammar. Extensive reading, also known as free reading or reading for pleasure: find texts about topics that you are interested in and just read. Obviously, the text can also be fiction. The ...


7

Here are 10 different options to help you find out your English level: 15 questions - Language Levels 83 questions - Cambridge Institute Cambridge Assessment placement test (must register) Grammar/Vocab test Listening test TrackTest (requires registration) ILS English EnglishTag Europa School (60 questions) EF Set (15 minutes)


6

I am not sure about "anything/everything", but after 3 years of watching CNN, you will be able to understand standard American accent. You might still have issues with other American accents (southern, black american vernacular, etc), and non-american accents (some accents in UK are hard even for native speakers) especially if person has a strong said accent....


5

As the people above have said, the best thing to do to improve your speaking skills is to find people around you or on the Internet with whom to speak. In another discussion, I have given a link to a Discord multilingual vocal server (like TeamSpeak) where it's possible to find a number of diverse language rooms : Ling & Lang: https://discordapp.com/...


5

I had to pass a TOEIC test and obtain more than 780/990 in order to graduate from my engineering school in France. The first time I took the test, I got 480. Fair to say, not quite enough! For the next year, having 2 hours of English classes a week, I started watching American TV series. From 24, to How I Met your Mother through Big Bang Theory, Dexter and ...


5

Some companies may not be familiar with CEFR and it may sometimes be safer to use descriptions such as "near native" or "fluent" (see e.g. Describing language skills on the Jobline LMU website). However, the Council of Europe (CoE) has pointed out that C2 is not meant to imply a near-native level: Level C2, whilst it has been termed ‘Mastery’, is not ...


5

There are various ways to learn or teach a foreign language. At one end, there is the direct method, and at the other end there are methods such as the bilingual methods and the grammar–translation method. The direct method uses only the target language. This means that you would be learning Japanese using only Japanese (no translations etc. in Chinese and ...


5

Being a native speaker of US English, I would recommend either a New York City or Philadelphia accent as having more-than-average phonological diversity. New York City and Philadelphia accents typically distinguish: Mary/marry/merry (merged nearly everywhere outside of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, New Orleans, and Boston) pin/pen (merged in most of ...


5

The most comprehensive grammar of the English language that I am aware of is The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey K. Pullum (Cambridge University Press, 2002). This doorstop of a book is 1860 pages long and I strongly advise against using this book as a resource for learning the grammar of English as a foreign ...


4

The accent in terms of phonetic prominence is not so important as dynamic accent (also called pitch accent). So the best is to be natural and not to "fake" your accent (the way you're talking—phonemic tone), just talk naturally. However if we're talking about dynamic accent, it's important that you apply the right stress on the right stressed syllables or ...


4

I'd use the same list that Christophe Strobbe referenced, but with a few corrections. As he stated, the top 10 most spoken languages in the world (excluding English), ordered by native speakers, are Mandarin, Spanish, Hindi, Arabic, Portuguese, Bengali, Russian, Japanese, Punjabi, and German. It isn't necessary to learn all of these languages to be able ...


4

| Should he learn it? | Obviously, if you could add a language to your son's linguistic diversity, you should definitely do so. English, particularly, is a very good choice as it is one of the most spoken languages on earth so it will be very useful in foreign countries - even ones that are not necessarily english-speaking countries. | Can he learn it? | ...


4

The website "Teaching English" has a few articles about English intonation and rhythm (and proncunciation in general). Lynn Gallacher's article English sentence stress describes a few exercises: Using limericks and other forms of poetry, since stress timing is very noticeable in this type of language. Students can even read their own limericks and read ...


4

I normally look for physical books or e-books when I look for graded readers, but there are a number of online resources that you can use. News in Levels is a website with an Android App and a YouTube channel that provides news stories in three levels. According to the sites home page, Level 1 has the 1000 most important words. Level 2 has the 2000 most ...


4

Definitively. And maybe even in a shorter time. But you will have to push your limits. If you just listen to get a general idea about the material, you can watch and watch and your level won't improve. Indeed, some people live for years in a foreign country and have a language proficiency at the A-level (in the EU framework, that is, the lowest). Search ...


4

There are three TOEIC tests that you can take: the TOEIC® Listening and Reading Test, the TOEIC® Speaking and Writing Tests, the TOEIC Bridge™ Test. The TOEIC Bridge™ Test is for "lower-intermediate level learners", which is a very vague description. To find out whether this test is something for you, you can free sample questions and the examinee handbook,...


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