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16

Yes. As seen in this article (though not primarily about linguistics), it promptly states: Some neuroscientists are not so sure. They think that giving up handwriting will affect how future generations learn to read. “Drawing each letter by hand substantially improves subsequent recognition,” Gentaz explains. Drawing each letter by hand improves our grasp ...


8

The Goldlist method is based on this assumption. I haven't found any peer reviewed articles on it, though. This article (citing research by Mueller and Oppenheimer) suggests that we do learn better by physically taking notes. Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension. It isn't specifically for language learning, though.


6

Learning (to improve) a language is done best practicing with other people, but in a lot of cases you will need some external feedback. And - from my experience - once you have reached a certain level people do not tend to indicate your mistakes anymore. Especially for writing you'd need some feedback and guide: online, a book, a self study group, or ...


5

There are several options but ultimately it comes down to you practicing writing and reading cursive: It's old-fashioned, but get several pen pals. Write back and forth to them. They will have different handwriting from each other and from you and will thus expose you to variety in handwriting. Also, the writing will help you improve your Hebrew. You need ...


5

Yes, it is useful in multiple ways: Writing (or Speaking, if the task is oral) -it teaches you to express your thoughts in the target language. Reading - it makes you read more carefully to comprehend more thoroughly. Vocabulary - it is another exposure to the language. You will have to struggle to bring words into your mind while writing or speaking, which ...


4

What I've done in the past is to obtain copies of the same novel in English and the target language. Then I'd translate (in writing) from English to the target language, using the target language version of the novel for correction. A watered down version of this is to translate in writing from English to the target language, then compare my version with ...


4

Dictionary creators who are not trained in linguistics or lexicography are in good company. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) created his A Dictionary of the English Language between the years 1746 and 1755 (year of publication). Johnson was not trained in linguistics or lexicography; he never finished university because he ran out of money. Johnson used ...


3

Here are several ideas: Tip of My Tongue: for words that you've been thinking about all day but just can't seem to remember. Reverse Dictionary: look up words by their definition. RhymeZone for rhymes, synonyms, adjectives, etc. Lexfn: for looking up related words based on a number of semantic relationships. PhraseUp: assists you with writing by finding and ...


3

I've done this from time to time in the past, with American novels and their forward translations. I can (probably) make myself "intelligible" with my own translations. But I learn a lot from reading "professional" translations. First are my obvious errors such as verb tenses and conjugations, and noun-adjective agreements, etc. But in the target language, ...


3

Surely the most natural technique is just to copy native speakers. Hear what they say and recreate that sentence using the same syntax E.g. Yesterday, I ate some sushi Which has a basic structure of: time adverb + subject + verb + article + object Then simply replace the structure with new words Tomorrow, John is going to drink a glass of water After hearing ...


3

If the language uses a logographic writing system, than teaching how to write is definitely part of language teaching. However, when and how the writing system is introduced depends on the teaching approach. When learning to write Chinese characters or hanzi, Japanese kanji and Korean Hangul, for example, you will also learn stroke order. Stroke order is ...


3

Creative writing as an important tool in second language acquisition and practice: However, creative writing, in particular poetry, provides a means of combining meaning-focused and form-focused tasks. With the exception of free formverse, poetry involves paying attention to meter, form, repetition and shape. Holmes and Moulton (2001) have shown how the use ...


2

This really varies by reader. What is unnatural to someone varies from person to person. I don't see it being unnatural (English being my native language). Some might see it strange, others might think the sentence is beautifully written. Really, as long the sentence doesn't seem unnatural to you and seems to make sense grammatically and speaking-wise, it ...


2

I've found that language exchanges are hard, especially when you speak English. Everyone wants to practice English. There are a few ways to convince a native speaker to speak their language to you: Pay them Some language apps like italki let you pay per lesson. If you're paying them, your conversation partner will be expected to speak their native language....


2

Have you had any luck locating language-specific classes, conversation groups, clubs, or Meetups? COVID-19 forced many of them online, opening the door to many that otherwise never would have been an option. The Duolingo Korean Learners group on Facebook may yield some conversation partners or information about available conversation groups and free/low-cost ...


2

This is a difficult situation. I don't know where you are located and how the Corona situation is at the moment, but many universities have language cafés or tandem programs that arrange contacts for students from foreign countries to native speakers that want to learn their languages. Mostly, they try to match partners that are at the same language level. ...


2

Free online texts in a pair of languages can be found in several ways. Of course, it depends on the language pair. Good bet would be a famous book in English (L1) translated to your target language (L2), or famous book in L2 translated to L1. If both your languages of interest are non-English, your choice might be more limited. For my searches, even while ...


2

I'm assuming you're looking for something like an app, web platform, or course that teaches you writing, but a more effective solution might be to download Grammarly. Grammarly is an excellent tool (don't worry, I'm not sponsored) that corrects your writing (both grammar and spelling), and it's much better/smarter than the built-in grammar checker in MS Word ...


2

I strongly recommend Fowler's Modern English Usage. It is directed towards native speakers but would clearly be accessible to you, and is exactly the sort of book you seem to need.(I'm a native English speaker and I find it enormously helpful). There is a fourth edition of Fowler's now available under the slightly changed title Fowler's Dictionary of Modern ...


2

Well, since you mentioned that I do not need to focus specifically on grammar method, I won't; I will instead focus in a general spectrum based on a previous answer of mine. This Guardian article explains this very well. The following is quoted from the article (statements made by "Edouard Gentaz, professor of developmental psychology at the University of ...


2

I wont't surprise you with the answer, that only practice in handwriting could help you to improve your handwriting. Moreover, you need to explain, what do you need Russian for :) In case you need to understand written text, speak and understand spoken speech, there's actually no need to learn Russian handwriting. We live in an digital century. I think it'...


1

Write short sentences. Make the sentences simple. The grammar you need is limited. If, for contrast, you were to use more complicated and longer sentences, then you are also far more likely to have to use more exotic grammatical structures. But there is a general principle: read a lot. You will get a feel for the grammar of the language and, after a while, ...


1

Your question relates directly to what is know as orthographic depth. If a language has a shallow orthography then there is a close correspondence (and, importantly, a reliable correspondence) between the way that the word is written and the way that it is pronounced. In contrast, a language with a deep orthography has a poorer (and less reliable) ...


1

I have been doing that manually with subtitled videos. When I write the text I hear, I simply hide the subtitles with a piece of paper. I also adjust the video playback speed to what I need, for example 0.75 the normal speed. When I am ready to correct, I replay the same video and compare the subtitles with my transcription. Sometimes, the voices and the ...


1

What you are experiencing is common for most language learners. Reading is passive learning and writing is active learning. Passive learning is where you absorb the information and consider the meaning. Active learning is where you analyze and then challenge the information learned. Another form of passive learning is listening and its active counterpart is ...


1

English is also my second language, for writing I recommend starting a journal, you could write maybe a paragraph or just a few lines every day, you could write about things you're grateful, about your dreams, about some things that has happened to you, basically about anything you want. It's also kinda therapeutical to write a journal, so it could help ...


1

Writing skill is one of the most important skill for learning language, and you said you are already immersed in a language so keep try hard. If you focus on increasing your writing skill, I would recommended you: Find some writing book and practice writing from that, that is the best way but only one problem is some book they might be the old version and ...


1

The best way to get new words in you writing to know them first. You should read at least one blog or story everyday and should note down the new words. Next time when you write anything, try to include those words.


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