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12

There are several that I can think of: Most notably, reading out loud allows you to improve your pronunciation of the language. This can help you identify sounds or accents you're having trouble with in the language. Reading out loud allows helps you feel more fluent while speaking with a native speaker. You will feel more confident when having a real ...


10

Concerning reading in general Reading is an excellent way to not only increase your vocabulary, but also increase your familiarity with the language in general, and help you learn from context (being able to guess from context is a valuable tool if your vocab isn't quite up to par with natives). However, reading alone isn't the "holy grail" to ...


9

Romance languages' vocabulary is already similar to Latin, since they all evolved from Vulgar Latin, but Latin's grammar is quite different and more complex with all of its cases and conjugations. Therefore, the main thing you need to do is learn Latin grammar. The Dowling Method is a famous way to do this. If you already fluently speak/read so many Romance ...


8

The Japanese Graded Readers published by White Rabbit Japan are available in 5 levels: level 0 corresponds to JLPT N5 (500 字 per story; 350 new words); level 1 corresponds to JLPT N4-5 (400 - 1.500 字 per story; 350 new words); level 2 corresponds to JLPT N4 (1.500 - 2.500 字 per story; 500 new words); level 3 corresponds to JLPT N3-4 (2.500 - 5.000 字 per ...


7

Definitely not. While reading aloud definitely does help you practice pronunciation, it is not an alternative to having a real conversation. Here's why: You're simply reading words off a page, meaning that you don't have to actually formulate sentences in your head. In a real conversation, you can't read words off a page; you have to directly answer the ...


7

Pros: You can learn and remember words from that book easily You can learn what synonym is actually used by the native people. For example, the translation of "Oh My God" is அடக் கடவுளே. But in real life we use words like அய்யோ, etc... This can be easily learned through the novel. Cons: You might actually skip some words and may not find it's meaning as ...


6

This is a problem I've had myself and still occasionally have trouble with. The best suggestion I have is to practice the L2 symbol names on a regular basis outside of just reading. For example, when counting something in daily life you could make an effort to count in your L2 rather than your L1. This will make the L2 numbers more familiar to you over ...


6

I'm not sure about studies, but there are a few polyglots who have commented on the usefulness of reading aloud. Olly Richards explains in his YouTube video Is reading aloud a helpful language activity? (September 2016) that reading aloud is not useful as a study method, except for practising pronunciation and intonation. As a pronunciation exercise, it is ...


6

The main benefit of reading texts that are at a significantly higher level than what you currently have, is probably in the classroom. When I was learning Chinese in Belgium, our teacher gave us Chinese newspaper texts after we had had only 260 classroom hours of Chinese. We could read at most 30 % of the characters in the text (and that is without ...


5

This reminded me of several things: Paraphasia can lead to word substitutions, but seems to affect speech rather than reading. See also semantic paraphasia in Psychology Dictionary. A "lexical selection error" and "substitution" (listed in Speech error on Wikipedia) also appear to refer (primarily?) to speech. Semantic dyslexia: 'Those who suffer from ...


5

What seems to be the key here is Grammar. When we begin to acquire the skills to be fluent in another language proper grammar understanding plays a very important role. So if you want that then you should spend a lot of time to consolidate grammatical rules, and practice them on a daily basis. Watching movies and shows in Italian (first with subtitles) will ...


5

Yes, it is useful in multiple ways: Writing (or Speaking, if the task is oral) -it teaches you to express your thoughts in the target language. Reading - it makes you read more carefully to comprehend more thoroughly. Vocabulary - it is another exposure to the language. You will have to struggle to bring words into your mind while writing or speaking, which ...


5

In order to find graded readers in French, you need to look for "[livres en] français facile" ("[books in] easy French"). However, not all books that are marked as "français facile" are graded readers for learners of French as a foreign language. If you find something like FLE (français langue étrangère: French as a foreign language) or a level indication ...


5

Low level texts are designed to be readable for beginners. For example, B1-level texts are supposed to contain words, which are expected to be known on this level and which has chance to be a part in text in B1-exam. Reading texts of higher level helps you to broaden your passive vocabulary. It's great idea to read a book you know in a different level (or ...


5

The Russian term for "graded reader" would be something like "Хрестоматия по русскому языку для студентов-иностранцев" or "адаптированные тексты для студентов-иностранцев". Or "книги для чтения" (для студентов-иностранцев) I'm a native speaker so I don't use these. Yet I've Googled it and I found this https://www.kniga.de/knigi/russkiy-yazyk/russkiy-yazyk-...


5

Sometimes, SRS really does just feel like a chore. I'm definitely not sufficiently consistent with my reviews. However, specifically with Japanese, I have discovered some other ways to improve my vocabulary and kanji reading skills. Note that these items are all items I do now and continue to find useful. I use Anki, typically, but sometimes making ...


5

There are several options but ultimately it comes down to you practicing writing and reading cursive: It's old-fashioned, but get several pen pals. Write back and forth to them. They will have different handwriting from each other and from you and will thus expose you to variety in handwriting. Also, the writing will help you improve your Hebrew. You need ...


5

Failure to understand what you read may be caused either by reader factors or text factors or environmental factors. Often a combination of two or more factors is the reason for misunderstanding. Reader factors include proficiency in the language of the text, especially vocabulary and grammar, background knowledge and interest in the topic of the text, and ...


4

Retaining vocabulary is great for those who are learning a new language and helps with writing and reading. With retaining your vocabulary instead of forgetting vocabulary, you are also retaining fluency. You should always strive to be more fluent within a language, that includes knowing a lot of vocab, what they mean, and when/how to use them properly. If ...


4

Well, the answer is: "It depends." When you have just started learning a language, most short stories will be too difficult, even stories that have been abridged and adapted for learners of Spanish (or whatever other language you might want to learn) (see graded readers). However, in some cases, you may be able to read such stories if you are familiar with ...


4

Why not listen to an audiobook of the Book of Mormon in the language you wish to learn? That way you can also learn the correct pronunciation. I know from past experience that reading new words will result in one guessing the correct pronunciation. I would just listen passively to begin with. You'll probably notice that new words begin to jump out at you as ...


4

Just speaking from my personal experience, I find it absolutely helpful to read aloud consistently for a sustained period of time every day (e.g. half a year). I improved my English and Spanish a lot just doing that without having many people to talk to. However you have to read after podcasts etc. where there's good/standard pronunciation to follow. Also I'...


4

Yes, it is definitely helpful to have the French subtitles even if they don't match the verbal text. The fact that you are hearing the difference is showing it's less passive than active. I do the same thing and find it spurs questions like "is there a subtlety in the dialog that's missed in the subtitles?" Luckily, my wife is French, so I have a ready ...


4

I can think of four ways that reading can help you learn the language. Vocabulary. Even if you aren't using a dictionary you will still learn new words from reading. You will be able to understand unknown words through context, and over time these words will become part of your active vocabulary. Grammar. As you read, your brain will practice ...


4

Keep in mind that reading and listening are, generally speaking, passive learning activities. And while passive learning is better than nothing, Active approaches (speaking, writing in the case of language learning) are much more effective for ANY type of learning, including language learning. That said, I think that ReadLang is a good partial solution for ...


4

In order to advance in the levels of a language, you may follow the classic approach: follow a path of only learning, going step by step in one or several courses. But, besides this one, you could also inmerse yourself in an environment where the target language is daily used, and with perseverance and motivation you will advance. But you could follow ...


4

Linguists who study vocabulary acquisition have looked at different "coverage levels" (% of known words) to investigate the relationship between coverage and adequate comprehension. Hu and Nation (2000) found: 80% coverage no reader achieved adequate comprehension 90% coverage a few achieved adequate comprehension 95% coverage some did but most did not (...


4

It's difficult to maintain interest in a text which is beyond your level, and you cannot learn words easily from context. It's a long and slow slog, looking up each word in the dictionary. However, when starting from a beginner level and progressing into early intermediate level, all available texts (newspapers, books) are too advanced. This creates an ...


3

As it turns out, the graded readers from Mandarin Companion have been converted to traditional characters. 安末 / Emma (300 unique characters); 卷发公司的案子 / Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Curly Haired Company (300 unique characters); 盲人国 (300 unique characters); 猴爪 / http://mandarincompanion.com/products/the-monkeys-paw/ (300 unique characters); 王子和穷孩子 / ...


3

One series of books for English from the late 1970s to mid 1980s was Streamline English by Bernard Hartley and Peter Viney, published by Oxford University Press and now out of print. It consisted of volumes titled Departures, Connections and Destinations. The series was created for use in classrooms rather than for self study. (This series was for British ...


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