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13

Sometimes an image speaks to people. Maybe try something like this.


9

Japanese learners of Standard Chinese have both advantages and disadvantages compared to native speakers of other languages. (I will simply write "Chinese" from here on.) According to Hu Xinghua, Many kanji still have have the same shape as the original hanzi. Out of the 2,500 hanzi in Table of Frequently Used Contemporary Chinese Characters, 1,683 ...


9

I actually find the reverse courses very useful. I have worked with the reverse courses in many languages, including Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, German, and Portuguese. Perhaps my experience is different because I am experienced with language learning and have a good sense of how I need to approach learning a language to make it work. Chinese and Japanese ...


8

Learning the stroke order probably does not help with learning the spoken language. However, with regard to the written language, the arguments that come closest to cognitive benefits are related to memorisation (including motor memory) and the ability to recognise characters. See the papers I found below. A paper by Law et al from 1998 points out that ...


7

The short answer is, yes. You could learn (to comprehend) a language just by being exposed to media and books. The longer answer is, yes, but... Books (and other language learning kits) provide a basis for language comprehension. They have rules and exercises to test your grammar and other non-interactive linguistic devices. However, this is a very limited ...


6

Interesting question! I've never thought about using reverse language courses to try to learn a language, so I tried it out. Since I'm fluent in Spanish, I tried out Duolingo's English for Spanish speakers course to see what I could observe. Here are some things I noticed: You'll be seeing a lot of the same words over and over again. For example, for every ...


6

The 1999 article "Using Radicals in Teaching Chinese Characters to Second Language Learners" by Marcus Tuft and Kevin Chung reported on a study where students who new nothing about the Chinese writing system ("naive learners") were taught 24 Chinese characters (each composed of 2 radicals from a set of 16 radicals) under the following conditions: Radicals ...


6

In mainland China, simplified Chinese characters are the dominant form of written Chinese. It's the type of characters used in newspapers, most books, in subtitles on TV, in dictionaries, at school etcetera. Traditional Chinese characters mainly used in Chinese-speaking communities and countries that were not under the governed by the Chinese Communist ...


5

Spaced Repetition is a great way to remember such words. Spaced Repetition can be done using paper flashcards, or computer software. The Leitner system is a simple way to do the employ the technique using paper flash cards. This article provides links to a number of such programs. Anki is perhaps the most popular, but sadly also one of the more complex ...


5

You definitely won't find Fuzhounese on any major online language learning platform, but I did find a pretty decent YouTube series that explains the basics of the language, which is taught by a native speaker meant for English speakers. The playlist consists of 16 videos, and each one focuses on a different basic topic, like numbers, colors, adjectives, and ...


5

It certainly isn't necessary to study Hanja to learn Korean or to take the TOPIK examination. The TOPIK contains no Hanja, so it's possible to get the highest level without studying Hanja. Also, many Koreans, especially younger ones, don't know Hanja very well. Even if they've studied them in school, they often don't retain them, because their use just ...


5

Short answer: no. Long answer: no, but it increases overall fluency and will help your legibility. Chinese (as well as other character-based language systems) can have characters that seem to differ only in the direction of the stroke (like 千 [qiān] vs 干 [gàn]). However, the stroke order is still the same. When I lived in Taiwan, I would ask natives what ...


5

(Since this question is just as relevant to Chinese as to Japanese, I will cite a few sources about learning Chinese.) Learning Japanese kanji or Chinese hanzi takes a lot of time. As far as I know, most books and schools start teaching characters from the beginning. However, there are also people who recommend against this. In his video on learning ...


5

There are various ways to learn or teach a foreign language. At one end, there is the direct method, and at the other end there are methods such as the bilingual methods and the grammar–translation method. The direct method uses only the target language. This means that you would be learning Japanese using only Japanese (no translations etc. in Chinese and ...


5

There are two important things about Terry Waltz that you need to know: she teaches Chinese to native speakers of English, so not everything she says about learning Chinese automatically applies to languages closer to English (or closer the native language of pupils or students), and she uses TPRS / Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling, ...


5

In my experience reading has always been easier than listening, but I think that is because the majority of my study comes from text based materials. Practice is definitely required for learning to be able to understand through context clues instead of just by picking up every word, but I also have two suggestions for strategies to target listening practice. ...


4

To be honest, personally I don't think Duolingo is useful at all for learning languages. That is, even if it had a Chinese for English speaker course, it wouldn't help you much at all. You'd be best spending your time elsewhere, on a more systematic approach, because it can be a huge timesink with little reward. I finished all Duolingo courses on Spanish, ...


4

A similar question was posed to Chinese Language Stack Exchange in 2014: Is there a comprehensive list of separable verbs/离合动词 anywhere? There are several lists out there, but they're not comprehensive--mostly the kind of things you'd find in a blog post-sized Chinese lesson on what the concept is: ChineseGrammarWiki, Separable verbs Mateja Petrovčič, Word ...


4

How can I help other learners of Standard Chinese to get the tones right? Especially without being a native speaker myself? You can help learners of Standard Chinese (Mandarin) get the tones right by using carrier sentences (see this article for further detail). A carrier sentence is a sentence with a blank slot for the word you'd like to hear in context. ...


4

To practice pronouncing two tones together, such as 哪里 and 那里, you could try tone pair drills. Chinese has a lot of two-character words and twenty possible combinations of tones and practicing these should help the learners to pronounce words better. The websites Hacking Chinese and Yoyo Chinese have more information on this topic.


4

Yes. There are proficiency tests for Standard Chinese that go beyond B2 and that cover at least level C1. The DLPT V offers assessments of High Level Language Proficiency. It has been 25+ years since I last took the DLPT. I am uncertain how openly it is offered. The Defense language Institute Foreign Language Center offers an (Open to the Public) Online ...


4

I found myself in a similar predicament early on in my language learning endeavors. Many people fall into the fallacy of "when I am watching TV or listening to it, I am only learning if I understand what they are saying." Our brains are designed to learn languages. Babies don't need flash cards. Trust that your mind is making connections and becoming more ...


4

If you would like to do professional translation in China, companies will often ask that you have an HSK level 6 or higher. I've also seen this requested from companies in Europe (the US tends to ask for its own tests instead of the Chinese HSK), but I also haven't seen it as a "hard requirement" anywhere. If you can advocate for yourself in Chinese ...


4

The HSK6 exam has a very specific, unnatural format, so studying unspecific material (such as native content), while generally helpful, will not target your HSK6 test-taking skills. If you definitely want native material to read, I suggest (a) news articles and opinion pieces at Sina (which are simpler than e.g. CCTV) or from mobile apps such as 看点快报 or 今日头条,...


3

Interesting. I have tried to learn Chinese by use reverse language course. I thought: You can learn that, but it is hard. You need to master Pinyin, but Duolingo will not help it. You cannot practice pronunciation by use Duolingo. So this is not suited for learning Chinese. I think Duolingo is not suited for learning Chinese, because I think Duolingo is ...


3

Yes it is. However it is hard for Japanese to learn Chinese pronunciation because Japanese and Chinese read same kanji differently, for example Japanese read 中 as "chuu" but Chinese "zhong."


3

This page on Emory University's website about HSK Sample Tests should be of use to you. There are 6 different sample tests, along with a relevant review of vocabulary and grammar. Unfortunately, I'm not fluent in Mandarin, so I can't check if the practice tests are in the form that you prefer. If they aren't, please let me know so I can find a better ...


3

I have explained this to one Chinese friend, but I have explained it often to myself as i try to master the usage of 太 in Chinese. The basic difference in English is just that "very" does not say whether the amount is good or bad or just right, while "too" says the amount is bad and less would be better. But nuance comes into it. If I say "the soup is ...


3

As it turns out, the graded readers from Mandarin Companion have been converted to traditional characters. 安末 / Emma (300 unique characters); 卷发公司的案子 / Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Curly Haired Company (300 unique characters); 盲人国 (300 unique characters); 猴爪 / http://mandarincompanion.com/products/the-monkeys-paw/ (300 unique characters); 王子和穷孩子 / ...


3

Your perspective intrigued me, so I'll share with you what I know of the Chinese language. Among Chinese, when a speaker of a (regional) dialect speaks with a thick accent and others can't understand him/her, they often resort to writing the words out. So being able to speak the language doesn't necessarily make one intelligible to other native speakers who, ...


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