19

Telegram is a messaging application that allows you to send voice recordings. There is an active community of Esperanto speakers in Telegram, and they can correct your pronunciation if you ask them too. It is also a great place to ask people for a real-time conversation. For this, you can use programs such as Skype, Google Hangouts, appear.in and Discord. ...


14

There seems to be an Esperanto group in Second Life that meet regularly and use the program's voice chat for conversations. Esperantujo en Dua Vivo


13

You can buy spoken lessons with several Esperanto tutors with italki: Find a Teacher.


10

You might also want to take the leap with a face-to-face event. I just found out about the Paralela Universo event through the "Language Stuff" vlog on Youtube. It looks to be open to beginners who haven't had the opportunity yet to talk with someone else. It would take a little courage to leap in as an organizer for an Esperanto event. I was considering ...


9

The audio from the two resources you mentioned (bolor-toli.com and studymongolian.net) can be downloaded, using these two bookmarklets: bolor-toli.com: javascript:!function(){function e(e,t,n,a,r,c){var o="/dictionary/sounds",i={word:a,trans_id:r,lang_id:c,notfound_message:t},l="script",s="POST",u=$.ajax({type:s,url:o,data:i,async:!1,dataType:l,beforeSend:...


7

If you've finished the Duolingo course (or equivalent), I'd highly recommend trying the new course Ekparolu. It's a free course which consists of 10 lessons on the topics you choose. You tell them what you want to practice talking about and they'll match you with a tutor who will help you speak on that topic for a half hour!


7

Definitely not. While reading aloud definitely does help you practice pronunciation, it is not an alternative to having a real conversation. Here's why: You're simply reading words off a page, meaning that you don't have to actually formulate sentences in your head. In a real conversation, you can't read words off a page; you have to directly answer the ...


7

You can learn from all kinds of audio learning materials, basically. If you want to achieve high proficiency level in the language you will need to have a conversation partner at some point, but it is possible to reach a pretty decent comprehension level before that. As for my experience: my first Mandarin audio course was FSI Chinese; I went through first ...


7

Unlike subjects such as chemistry, history or linguistics, language as such does not have a specific focus or topic. You can use it to speak about anything, or at least anything that is within the limits of your language skills. So when you are confronted with the question, "Say something in X", you need to pick something from a vast range of choices that ...


7

There is plenty of research on this topic. The Use of Music for Learning Languages: A Review (Stansell) asserts that (emphasis mine): The researchers in this literature review show conclusively that music and language should be studied together. Music‟s success is due, in part, to primal human abilities. Music codes words with heavy emotional and ...


7

I have some experience with the struggle you are describing in your post. My boyfriend with whom I am living is not from an English speaking country, nor am I. As I am not yet proficient in his mother tongue, we use English a lot to communicate. During the first months of our relationship, I could realize how I was adopting his mistakes. So I had to take ...


6

I'm Thai and living in Bangkok, so I'll answer specifically for Thai language. How important are correct tones to understanding a whole sentence (words in context) in tonal language? If I use mostly right tones, but use few wrong tones, will be native speaker able to decode and fill the right tones? Or even few wrong tones will make the sentence ...


6

I struggle with the same issue while learning Spanish. My ability to listen and understand is much higher than my ability to speak. I use the following to improve: Exercise your conversation. Try to get into a conversation in your language of choice as much as possible. E.g. get classes, get in contact with the community, go to the Chinese barber, etc. ...


5

I used to use a site called Fluent in three Months. It practically teaches you how to use a language and speak it properly, and encourages you to upload a video of yourself (set challenges) so you can get feedback on your pronunciation and speech. Very helpful website, you should check it out.


5

Here are several references to get you started: How Long Does It Take English Learners To Attain Proficiency? Investigating Fluency in EFL: A Quantitative Approach Oral Skill Development in Second Languages (link to PDF)


5

This is an area that linguists call communicative strategies (or communication strategies). There are several strategies that you can use: Circumlocution: using different words or phrases to express your meaning. For example, saying "my father's mother" instead of "my grandmother". Semantic avoidance: avoiding a problematic word by using a different one. ...


5

There are many things you can do, but you'll need to schedule your time carefully. With regard to resources, it will be useful to get a textbook to get started, e.g. Afan Oromo: A Guide to Speaking the Language of Oromo People in Ethiopia by Abebe Bulto. A grammar book, such as Modern Afaan Oromo Grammar: An Invitation To A Cushiatic Language by Taha M. ...


5

Speaking in your head is better than nothing, but speaking out loud is better. The reason speaking out loud is better is because you train your mouth to make the sounds of the new language. Your mouth needs a LOT of training if you want to develop a good accent and acquire a normal speaking speed. You can certainly develop your speaking skills by yourself. ...


5

There is no reason to think that a Passive Bilingual/Speaker can't become a fluent speaker. In fact, they should have an easier time than someone who is learning the language from scratch. The main issue the person will have to overcome, and this could be a mental block, is actively using the language. They are so used to just listening and comprehending ...


5

I would strongly recommend learning the correct pronunciation from the start instead of a pronunciation based on a different language, for several reasons: You will later need to invest time and effort to unlearn all the incorrect pronunciations. This time is better spent on something more productive. You might get confused when using listening materials ...


4

I speak both Mandarin and Cantonese, and I can tell you tones are pretty important, because it is like singing, if you sing on the wrong tone, sometimes we might be able to guess what you sing, but it won't be beautiful, and it might be misleading. Also it depends on how many words are off tone. When my Cantonese was not good enough, one of my friends had ...


4

Practice, practice, practice. I met some polyglots at the Polyglot Gathering in Berlin and a lot of them are simply very strict with themselves. One that I met usually has tandem meetings where he speaks in one language and his partner another. That is one way to get used to the interference of another language. Look at the words that you "get wrong" and ...


4

Because the phrase "to speak a language" is vague. It can vary from an ability for a small talk "about the weather" or negotiate in a local market and end up with an ability to participate a discussion about the poetry or literature in target language. When curious bystanders ask you to "say something in X", quite often they don't even care about that ...


4

Just speaking from my personal experience, I find it absolutely helpful to read aloud consistently for a sustained period of time every day (e.g. half a year). I improved my English and Spanish a lot just doing that without having many people to talk to. However you have to read after podcasts etc. where there's good/standard pronunciation to follow. Also I'...


4

Try carrying on a running commentary in your mind, or even in a quiet voice, as you walk along the street or do shopping, study road conditions, plan your evening's activities, etc. As you acquire facility in monologue-mode, you'll probably notice increased speed and sophistication in real dialogues. I've used this trick when learning European languages. I ...


4

According to Memrise, you have 1100 words in your long-term memory, but according to your experience, it doesn't sound like you have 1100 words in your active vocabulary. Your 1100 words (or so) are in your passive vocabulary (evidenced when you said "I can listen to their conversations..."), meaning you can understand them when they are used, but since they'...


4

I am not familiar with any research, but I did teach Spanish using current popular songs in Spanish and used them as dictations. I would print the lyrics and place a blank where some words were. I would use this as a "warm-up" at the beginning of class, giving them the lyrics and playing the music. Then we would discuss the song and what it said, ...


4

To answer your question, I feel the second question must be answered first. L2 learners must be continually learning the L2 because native speakers are continually learning their own language if we are honest about it. Perhaps, as a native speaker of Southern-American English, I learn new British-English or slang from another part of the country, or as ...


4

I'm not a phonetician, but my understanding is that pretty much no language has physical "gaps" in the sense of actual periods of silence between subsequent words. (I think that this would be pretty inefficient from the point of view of communicating the greatest amount of information in the shortest amount of time.) So the idea of "gaps" ...


4

There is few dialects are well understood in most Arabic speaking countries, Egyptian is not the only one. There is also the Syrian dialect (Lebanese and Jordanian are so close/similar). Egyptian movies and songs are so popular, and that helps Arabic speaking people to get used to it and understand it. The same for Syrian dialect, Syrian songs and ...


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