26

Using a voice recorder to record your interaction with a native speaker provides feedback for yourself throughout the week when you do not have him/her with you. If you are proficient in the IPA, make notes as the native speaker corrects your pronunciation. Audiovisual resources will allow you to compare yourself to where you were the last time you "did a ...


19

For individual words, you could try forvo.com - record yourself saying the word, and compare that with the pronunciation on the site. Phrases and intonation for whole sentences is much more difficult. Of course, forvo is only useful if you can actually hear the difference in the sounds... Also, if you're learning Japanese, keep in mind you also want to ...


19

Pronunciation is indeed evaluated in the CEFRL tests. The specific criteria are available, and are reproduced for C1 below: Is intelligible Intonation is appropriate Sentence and word stress is accurately placed. Individual sounds are articulated clearly A sample assessment sheet shows what an evaluator might identify regarding the last ...


16

A straightforward way is to learn the words in a way where you not only see the word but also hear the word. When learning new words with Anki, AwesomeTTS can automatically generate an audio-file with the proper pronounciation. Other solutions like Pimsleur Tapes, Rosetta Stone or Duolingo also will give the learner the correct pronunciation.


14

Getting fluent in the full range of IPA is overkill for the most practical purposes (essentially, you only need it for phonetic transcription or documentation of unwritten languages/dialects). Instead, concentrate on the subset of IPA used in the target language you want to learn. Langenscheidt dictionaries come with handy tables in the front matter of the ...


13

There are a number of things you can try: Trial and Error The simplest technique for teaching an unfamiliar sound, but still often quite effective. Produce the sound yourself, or play a recording of it, and then have them try to reproduce it. Repeat until they are successful. Minimal pairs The same idea as above, but instead of just pronouncing the ...


10

It's important first to determine what difficulties she has with pronunciation. It could be: Difficulty producing English phonemes that don't exist in the L1. Difficulty remembering how certain words are pronounced, especially when the spelling is confusing. Difficulty using English intonation and stress patterns. Difficulty producing certain phonemes ...


10

How do you learn IPA and the basics of Phonetics? 'IPA' and 'Phonetics' may appear difficult terms; but not after you spend 5 minutes to read the following. IPA Chart with Sounds & Video Animations While reading the books below, you should listen to and always refer to the sounds themselves. Keep these links below open on your computer for instant ...


9

It sounds as if your problem is that you are applying English phonology (ie: how sounds are organised and patterned in English) to Italian. Are you learning pronunciation passively by ear? Hereafter, abbreviate L2 for Second Language. Step 1. Learn IPA. Why? Only IPA can empower you with: 1.1. independence (because you no longer need to rely on English ...


9

Nasal vowels are produced by forcing air through both your mouth and nose simultaneously. We have such vowel sounds occasionally in some English dialects, but they aren't considered significant (that is, if they are said non-nasally, they are not misunderstood), which is why most IPA transcriptions don't include the /◌̃/ nasal sign. One example is to ...


8

Speech is produced by the passage of air through the phonatory organs. You can refer to these Wikipedia articles about phonatory process (production of speech) and the phonatory organs. Here is an article by a linguist "Pronunciation is a physical exercise" giving advice to people learning a foreign language, ending with: The conclusion is that you ...


8

As with most subjects, taking a class or receiving private tutoring is probably best. A course in phonetics will teach you not only the International Phonetic Alphabet itself but enough information to know how to use that alphabet correctly. This free online course from MIT, called "Phonology", is actually a phonetics and phonology course and covers the IPA. ...


8

Learning IPA is useful if you want to learn the pronunciation of words from a dictionary. However, IPA is less useful in the following cases (non-exhaustive list): You are using dictionaries that use an alternative phonetic transcription system (e.g. the Encarta World English Dictionary used a different system). You are learning a language with a very ...


7

I think the right way to learn the right word pronunciations is to get the proper pronunciation dictionary (or any dictionary where each word is associated with its dictionary). By dictionary, I mean either: hard-paper dictionaries (e.g. Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary) on-line dictionaries (e.g. Oxford, Cambridge, M&W or simply Google ...


7

One thing that helps a lot towards improving one's pronunciation is knowing how a sound is produced, what phonatory organs are involved and how to place those. With a willing adult you can try a scientific approach. Here is what I personally find a very good tool (I'm aware others might disagree) on the site of the University of Iowa, insofar as it has ...


7

After several hours of searching for a website for minimal pairs, I have become convinced that this does not exist yet, or at least not in a language that I can read fluently. The list of minimal pair resources I have collected so far is now available on my website. A site for minimal pairs with the scope of Forvo.com or RhinoSpike would be useful, but is ...


7

In order to learn to hear the difference between similar sounds, you need to learn to distinguish so-called minimal pairs. A minimal pair is a pair of words that differ in only one sound, for example "pin" and "bin", or "cheap" and "chip" in English. The concept of minimal pairs can even be extended to minimal sets: groups of words whose pronunciation ...


6

Note that this answer partially relies on personal experience, as my L1 is Italian. Explaining the tongue position When rolling the R, the tongue must be behind your incisors. Sound generation The biggest difference between the soft-R and the rolled-R is the source of where the r gets generated. When doing a soft-R you generate the sound in your ...


6

The only phonetic alphabet I know of that is comparable to IPA in universality and language coverage is X-SAMPA. The advantage of X-SAMPA compared to IPA, is that it contains only ASCII characters and is therefore easy to type. The disvantage of X-SAMPA is that it's harder to read, and there are definitely much fewer people who read it fluently than those ...


6

There are various things you can do: Record your voice and listen to it so you become aware of how you sound. There are various software programs and apps that you can use for this, for example Audacity (free and open source; works on GNU Linux, MS Windows and Mac OS) and Recordium (for iPhone and iPad). There are many YouTube videos that can help you get ...


6

While the IPA is an invaluable tool for English even if you're a native speaker, in languages spelled phonetically it's mostly useful for the initial stages and there's no reason to keep using IPA once you learn the rules. Being able to read IPA was useful for me when studying French, because it has a lot of vowels and the rules can get complicated to ...


6

Direct method: pronunciation is taught through intuition and imitation; students imitate a model - the teacher or a recording - and do their best to approximate the model through imitation and repetition. See here for more: Pronunciation Teaching History and Scope


6

Definitely not. While reading aloud definitely does help you practice pronunciation, it is not an alternative to having a real conversation. Here's why: You're simply reading words off a page, meaning that you don't have to actually formulate sentences in your head. In a real conversation, you can't read words off a page; you have to directly answer the ...


5

I am a native English speaker who read many books as a child. As a result of this I have often said a word I learned from a book only to be told that it is pronounced completely differently than I thought. In a language like English these mistakes may be inevitable because of the way rules of pronunciation shift so dramatically between words. In a language ...


5

Yes, as long as it is not "unintelligble." There are four competencies, reading, writing, listening, speaking, each weighted 25%. To pass C1, or any other level, you need a total of 60%, with at least 5% in each category. I'm going to assume that the basis for your C1 evaluation is reading, and either writing or listening, and that speaking is your worst ...


5

Few languages are 100% phonetic. Even Spanish has oddities in a few foreign words which retain their foreign spelling, words from indigenous American languages, etc. Also letters have subtle differences in their pronunciation between languages and even how they sound before or after certain other letters or sounds. IPA can render both phonemic (broad) and ...


5

In the first chapter of his book Philology ((c) 2014 Princeton University Press), James Turner describes the notation systems created by Zenodotus of Ephesus, the first "librarian" (ca. 270 BCE) of Ptolomy II's massive library at Alexandria, Egypt. Zenodotus developed his system to help edit the massive number of papyri originals and copies of works by ...


5

As I found no such web site, I have created one, MinimalPairs.net. At present, it only has minimal pairs for French, Dutch, American English, and Spanish, but as time permits, I intend to expand this list (volunteers welcome--submit feedback on the page to help).


5

Minimal pair is a language-internal concept; it is not directly related to language learning or to existence of other languages. As Wikipedia says: In phonology, minimal pairs are pairs of words or phrases in a particular language that differ in only one phonological element, such as a phoneme, toneme or chroneme, and have distinct meanings. They are used ...


5

Words that differ by only one sound, e.g. 'd' or 't' ("had" versus "hat"), are known as minimal pairs. So what you need is training on minimal pairs. The English Club website has a list of minimal pairs for 'd' and 't' at the end of words: Minimal Pairs final /t/ and /d/. John Higgins created a website with lots of minimal pairs: Minimal pairs for ...


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