15

Three hours/day for 3 years is over 3000 hours. That is a LOT of time, so, YES, you can do it if you take the right approach. You are already well past the beginner stage. But of course you will have to put in a lot of work to achieve your goal. Find a tv series or movie that you really love and are willing to watch many times. Your tv/movie viewing must ...


14

There is a Wikipedia page about Sleep-learning (hypnopædia, or hypnopedia) referring to two studies indicating no significant learning effects during sleeping: Since the electroencephalography studies by Charles W. Simon and William H. Emmons in 1956, learning by sleep has not been taken seriously. The researchers concluded that learning during sleep was &...


11

Learning a language is not an easy task, and can often take years to master. The best advice I can give you is to force yourself to do tasks that you'd normally do in your native language instead in English. For example, watching the news, listening to the radio, or watching TV. If you can't move to an English speaking country and surround yourself in the ...


10

I had similar problems with listening comprehension of American English. Being very fluent in writing English, I could barely understand radio or TV. To overcome this problem I did three steps: Watching movies with turned on subtitles. I purchased a Netflix subscription and started watching movies with enabled subtitles. Those usually appear a fraction of ...


10

A method I find very useful is listening to a talk radio channel in the target language while I do other stuff such as cleaning, cooking or typing answers on Stack Exchange. The point is to focus on something else and just have the radio in the background. Then when I go and do some active listening with my study resources I find it much easier, because I am ...


8

Like you said, some key factors that make a language video useful for learners are: Slow and clear pronunciation (like you said above) Repetitive usage of words or phrases that the learner is learning at that time (by repeating them over and over again, maybe in complement with visual cues, you help build a stronger vocabulary) Use of visual cues in ...


8

Be patient, 8 months isn't very long. I like your approach to letting her talk to the sales person. It gives her instant gratification when she gets something right and is useful in everyday life. Learning something that is useful is a great way to keep a student motivated. Unfortunately I don't have a whiz bang magical way to improve listening. The best ...


7

My linguistics professors at university told me that all languages are roughly equally difficult because children learn their native language at roughly the same speed across the world. Languages that are difficult in one respect (say, morphology) are usually easier in another respect (say, word order). However, "language" in this kind of statement refers to ...


7

Firstly, it does seem that some languages might be inherently more difficult than other languages to learn in the classroom. This is because many languages have large amounts of irregulars, exceptions to grammar rules, and things like that. Some languages also have larger useful lexicons than others, but that seems pretty marginal. However, given that ...


7

I think I understand where you're coming from, however, I don't think you need to worry. You already seem to have a fairly good understanding of English, and translating from Persian to English is definitely not going to harm your English skills, rather, it should help your mind better understand the difference between the two languages, and (this idea ...


7

This is quite difficult since preferences can't exactly be proven by research which brings up the answer: whatever works for you. Take the cielo24 article for instance. It promptly states that: If the student is trying to take notes while they are watching the video, the subtitles will make it easier to copy what is being said. Watching a video with ...


6

I am not sure about "anything/everything", but after 3 years of watching CNN, you will be able to understand standard American accent. You might still have issues with other American accents (southern, black american vernacular, etc), and non-american accents (some accents in UK are hard even for native speakers) especially if person has a strong said accent....


6

Yes, there is such a thing as an inherent difficulty of a language. All languages are learnable by children, but it is clear that there are features that require more time to learn, and languages having these features can be classified as inherently harder than others. Consider research on first-language acquisition of past tense inflection in Icelandic, ...


6

Apart from all the good suggestions previously mentioned (Watching movies, make the listening activities useful and relevant to everyday life), I would like to give you some specific pointer about what to do and what not to do: Find authentic, easy and interesting material for her. Authentic means is made by German people for German people, not for learners....


5

TL;DR Passive speaker You've probably seen something like this before, +-----------------+-----------+------------+ | LANGUAGE SKILLS | RECEPTIVE | PRODUCTIVE | +-----------------+-----------+------------+ | | | | | Auditory | Listening | Speaking | | | | | | Textual ...


5

You are correct, let her be herself when learning. When fluent with the basic and, hopefully, some advanced parts of her language, she should try to naturally speak to others to see if she can recall the words quickly and correctly. To help with her listening, try these methods: Watching movies, clips, or some type of video Reading books and poems out loud ...


5

The University of Queensland suggest multiple points related to using videos for learning in general but do apply do language learning. Visual cues helps memory processing and memory recall. This is clear with learning in general: lots of people learn quicker and/or better with the association of photos and their respective words Shepard and Cooper (1982)...


5

Sometimes, SRS really does just feel like a chore. I'm definitely not sufficiently consistent with my reviews. However, specifically with Japanese, I have discovered some other ways to improve my vocabulary and kanji reading skills. Note that these items are all items I do now and continue to find useful. I use Anki, typically, but sometimes making ...


5

In my experience reading has always been easier than listening, but I think that is because the majority of my study comes from text based materials. Practice is definitely required for learning to be able to understand through context clues instead of just by picking up every word, but I also have two suggestions for strategies to target listening practice. ...


4

Definitively. And maybe even in a shorter time. But you will have to push your limits. If you just listen to get a general idea about the material, you can watch and watch and your level won't improve. Indeed, some people live for years in a foreign country and have a language proficiency at the A-level (in the EU framework, that is, the lowest). Search ...


4

Keep in mind that reading and listening are, generally speaking, passive learning activities. And while passive learning is better than nothing, Active approaches (speaking, writing in the case of language learning) are much more effective for ANY type of learning, including language learning. That said, I think that ReadLang is a good partial solution for ...


4

Yes, it is definitely helpful to have the French subtitles even if they don't match the verbal text. The fact that you are hearing the difference is showing it's less passive than active. I do the same thing and find it spurs questions like "is there a subtlety in the dialog that's missed in the subtitles?" Luckily, my wife is French, so I have a ready ...


4

Whether it is a good idea or not to listen to a specific radio programme depends on the difficulty level of the language. If the programme's level is at your level or just a little bit higher, you will be able to understand most of it and you should be able to guess the meaning of many other words and expressions. The type of input you get is known as ...


3

Information from Quora : Passive learning is an important element in the language education approach referred to as Immersion or Total Immersion. Much research has been done on the effectiveness of this method and Education Week has an interesting two-part blog article on this at this article On the site you can download a PDF of the entire research paper ...


3

Like you said, the context can help you to learn a new word. That same context, in my opinion, is better than a flashcard or a vocab list. Words are better learned when in context, so learning phrases is more powerful that trying to retain a single word. The brain thinks in pictures, not words. So, by using contexts, your brain can build a stronger picture ...


3

My experience is that even after passing HSK4 (1200 words, 1064 characters) with ~90% in the listening and reading part, and now closing in HSK5, I am still not fully comfortable to sitcoms without pausing once in a while (都挺好, 他来了 请闭眼, etc). So most answers relying on HSK word count have to be taken with a grain of salt. HSK will definitely help you, but ...


2

There have been several good suggestions to practice listening in the previous posting. There is another point: You can train the typical formats of listening comprehension tests (answering yes/no questions of things being heard, answering multiple choice questions, answering questions with free answers). But one week before the test is a very tight ...


2

In my opinion, dictation is a useful exercise to develop writing skills. It improves one's style and forces to use less familiar vocabulary and grammar structures. However, listening comprehension is a skill that needs to be performed at conversational speed. One needs to practice listening to spoken language with its irregularities: dialects, broken ...


2

Something else that is very frequently translated into many languages is religious scripture and religious publications in general. Here are some examples: E-Sword - A Bible Study tool with many free and premium versions of the Christian Bible in various languages, including some ones less frequently studied such as Samoan, Welsh, and Romanian. It also ...


2

Forvo.com actually does allow you to submit word requests. If a word is not found, for example, kakistocratie, you get a response that looks as follows: For readability, here is what this message says: "Wow, you actually found a word not on Forvo!" Below that is a blue button with the words, "Add kakistocratie to know its pronunciation". If you click that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible