4

Practically, no, but with huge amounts of time and willpower, maybe. In Japan, for example, there is a small community of people from developing countries as well as Chinese people who largely learned to speak Japanese from sheer exposure and being forced to use it for work, but they were probably taught by friends and family. Personally, however, as ...


3

I've done this from time to time in the past, with American novels and their forward translations. I can (probably) make myself "intelligible" with my own translations. But I learn a lot from reading "professional" translations. First are my obvious errors such as verb tenses and conjugations, and noun-adjective agreements, etc. But in the target language, ...


3

Easiest option is to use some language exchange (which are many, google is your friend). You promise to do some work for a Burmese speaker, and get something in return. I would assume there are many Burmese speakers who are interested in improving their speaking proficiency (they already can read and write some English, which you have sufficient skills, ...


2

Here are several ideas: Tip of My Tongue: for words that you've been thinking about all day but just can't seem to remember. Reverse Dictionary: look up words by their definition. RhymeZone for rhymes, synonyms, adjectives, etc. Lexfn: for looking up related words based on a number of semantic relationships. PhraseUp: assists you with writing by finding and ...


2

I prefer monolingual dictionaries where possible. If I want to translations in particular, I use Wiktionary via https://www.sanakirja.org/ (no affiliation). The benefit is that when I write a word there, it gives the translation in all languages covered by Wiktionary; for example https://www.sanakirja.org/search.php?q=kaukoputki. This often helps in ...


2

I think that restricting your option to only professional translator you seriously limit your chances of succeeding. Far better approach will be IMHO to learn the best L2 you can, and find a job in area where you can use it performing other duties: hospitality industry, foreign trade, etc. This will pay the bills while you cover the gap: your skills growing ...


2

If your translation technique should be improved is only contingent on it being fit for its purpose. For instance, if it allows you to understand Japanese texts at a reasonable pace and if that is what you are going for, then it is appropriate. For as to how you could go about improving it, I will suggest you take a look at "glossing" because what you are ...


2

Free online texts in a pair of languages can be found in several ways. Of course, it depends on the language pair. Good bet would be a famous book in English (L1) translated to your target language (L2), or famous book in L2 translated to L1. If both your languages of interest are non-English, your choice might be more limited. For my searches, even while ...


1

How can a Hindi speaker understand Nepali? With a fair amount of practice reading and listening in Nepali would be helpful here. As the old saying goes practice makes perfect. Are Hindi and Nepali mutually intelligible? No, they are very similair but no they are not mutually intelligible. However if you learn to read Hindi you can read Nepali, and learning ...


1

I suppose it's a wrong impression. The examples you give appear impressive, but that may be due to survivor bias, because we don't see how many examples you misunderstand, or how much prior knowledge you had: translating "lieblings" out of hand--who are you kidding? If you looked it up, that's hind-sight bias; Knowing Moll as a musician--likely; recognizing -...


1

That depends on a few variables. If you want to be a legal or medical interpreter, you are more likely to have clients who don't speak English. However, if the majority of medical and legal professionals in Bangladesh are already fluent in English as they are presumably in India, they will have no need for your help. If you wish to be a corporate or tourist ...


1

It is definitely possible, but you need some half decent learning materials. French for foreigners in France and Belgium are exclusively taught without translation and it works fine. You learn the basic words from pictures and learn more by training. Reading simple stories helps a lot. I personally learnt the basics of croatian just like that from the ...


1

I'm not aware of any, but would be interested as well. I used to contribute to Wikinews - and did some translations there of articles to and from english, but that typically was by myself, not collaboratively. You say your interest is in translating linguistic academic articles - I assume that you're thinking of open access, that is freely shareable and ...


1

I'm the live evidence of that, I'm a literary translator. I started as a teenager by translating a (fairly easy) poem by Lorca. Translating literary works can bring great benefits but the learners must be ready for it. They must have an ear for their native language (things like style differences etc), the literary work should be something they can relate to ...


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