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11

As you know, there are different strains of modern Hebrew pronunciation, including the two major ones: Ashkenazi and Sephardi (by the names I learned them, anyway). Ashkenazi pronunciation is influenced by Yiddish, which in turn is largely Germanic and features some other common European sounds. When I was in Israel, for example, I heard a lot of the uvular [...


9

Duolingo has a fully hatched course in its incubator program, in which new languages are added to Duolingo. The course in Hebrew is now in public beta. Go on and give it a try!


8

I'm an Hebrew native speaker, not a teacher nor a linguistic expert. I love learning new languages, a hobby I only "discovered" after age 35. I can tell you as a language learner and as a Hebrew speaker that starting with the biblical Hebrew is much harder as you will not only have to learn uncommon sentence structures but also way more "passive" ...


6

It's easier to memorize a pattern than a paradigm. Instead of memorizing the conjugation, you could memorize a rule to identify it. This is more useful when you're trying to understand a text, rather than to be able to express yourself in a language, but ability to express yourself is also better after a lot of exposure to the language, which would make ...


5

There are several options but ultimately it comes down to you practicing writing and reading cursive: It's old-fashioned, but get several pen pals. Write back and forth to them. They will have different handwriting from each other and from you and will thus expose you to variety in handwriting. Also, the writing will help you improve your Hebrew. You need ...


4

I'm no expert in Hebrew, but I did find this extremely helpful YouTube playlist of 6 videos that directly addresses difficult pronunciation sounds in Hebrew for native English speakers. The videos are also very recent, as the last one was posted in September 2015.


4

I'm an European and my native language is part of the Romance family of languages. I wasn't born in a bilingual family. Still, I've been studying MH for some years in University and I agree that there are advantages to gaining a basic fluency in MH before attempting BH. Why? You'll get used with the Hebrew script, an issue which concerns reading. Reading ...


4

The closest free online resource that I know of is this at pealim.com. You can set the shoresh and the binyan. Pretty good. A good book, if you can get it, is Hebrew Verbs and Conjugations by Shraga Assif. It shows pretty much every construction possible for lots of roots. I bought my copy in Israel several years back. Teach Me Hebrew Lessons 14-22 have a ...


3

You should memorize two things: The prefixes and suffixes that apply to ALL the binyanim. Here is an example of what I'm talking about. A full conjugation example for each of the seven binyanim. Don't waste your time memorizing the conjugation of every single verb. This knowledge will give you 95% (I'm making up this number, but you get the idea) of what ...


3

I'm not sure what style of course you prefer, but the best and most in-depth podcast in Hebrew that I liked was LearnHebrewPod. There is a ton of information there. Another great resource, though not really a traditional course, is TeachMeHebrew, which is a very unique site with great songs, lessons, and other useful information. As for other online course ...


3

PART 1: Survey of educated Israelis I got in touch with four very educated Israelis (all have Master's and/or PhD), and this is what they said: Israeli #1: daled, yud, and kuf are the common pronunciations, and dalet, yod, kof are the "correct" ones. Israeli #2: daled, yod, kuf are taught in school. Israeli #3: daled, yud, and kuf are the common ...


3

Practice writing the Hebrew letters and sample Hebrew words. When you know how to write the letters, the motoric memory helps you also in recognition of the written or printed letters.


3

Have you tried reverse engineering to your solution? Perhaps first familiarize yourself with the basic Hebrew words, learn them, in order to get a better idea of the alphabets and their place in the language? You could easily learn most of the common words and phrases with simple flashcard apps like Hebrew Locker or Beginner Hebrew https://play.google.com/...


2

I've tried the Hebrew version of Word Fireworks. It costs $2 and available from the App Store, Google Play, and Amazon. It's definitely a beginner app and probably best for picking up the writing system. The app involves tracing Hebrew characters with your finger so you can communicate with aliens using pyrotechnics. The app appears to be only available ...


2

To add to the other resources mentioned here, I know of a Beginner Hebrew app and the Hebrew Locker app, both for Android. Both apps work primarily on the basic Hebrew vocabulary and help you learn the commonly used Hebrew words and phrases from scratch and at your own pace.


2

Read aloud and do so often. If you're in an environment where you can encounter Hebrew now and again, keep your eyes peeled. (I wonder if Google Maps street view would help if you're not.) And look for words whose pronunciation you already know. I remember, for example, how many English words were transcribed in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. Can you recognize ...


2

As a fellow Hebrew learner, I would recommend that you focus on whichever language interests you. There is absolutely no need to learn Modern Hebrew in order to learn Biblical Hebrew, and vice versa, as there are separate study materials for each. But if you are equally interested in learning both, then I would start with learning the basics of Modern and ...


2

For Biblical Hebrew, you will find a commonly used item here: Graded Reader of Biblical Hebrew: A Guide to Reading the Hebrew Bible by Miles V. Van Pelt and Gary D. Pratico (Zondervan Academic, 2006). This item by Van Pelt and Pratico is a follow-up to their excellent beginning Hebrew book/workbook set and is used by some colleges for an advanced Hebrew ...


2

I've found Lewis Glinert's Modern Hebrew: An Essential Grammar (no relationship) to be a great resource. The verb charts are not all in one page, but the are concise and easy to look up. This is not an introductory Hebrew book - the author even mentions this in his introduction: Modern Hebrew is not a graded, step-by-step coursebook. Of those there are many....


2

What is your native language? If it helps you, Ayin is rather close to Russian "ы", but more to the throat and shorter. Start with the phoneme /ɨ/ (more rear or upper than i) and try to pronounce it even shorter and more rear. You can also listen to songs of Arik Einstein - he pronounces ayin.


2

Hebrew is very consistent in its vowel structure. A list of shoresh's is probably more appropriate for your needs than a list of 400,000 words. The Shoresh retains its basic meaning whether it is a noun, verb, etc. The vowels used in the shoresh is based on inflection. For example, the shoresh מלח (salt) can be a noun מֶלַח or an adjective מָלוּחַ. ...


1

Probably the best Modern Hebrew morphology reference that I've found is Lewis Glinert's Modern Hebrew: An Essential Grammar (no relationship). In this book, Glinert mentions that he is, in fact, concentrating on usage rather than prescription, but goes into detail as to how the presence of specific root letters (e.g. א, ע, ח, etc.) affect the final ...


1

Not sure whether it will help: wikipedia has rather big word frequency lists, but it also includes conjugated forms and no translations. Here it is


1

Update: I have found forvo.com, which has a Hebrew pronunciation dictionary. For the most part, this site has been extremely helpful and very extensive. I recommend forvo.com for auditory for Hebrew.


1

See the following in wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_alphabet#Stylistic_variants It has different types of Hebrew Alphabet.


1

The following open source typing tutors may be worth a try: KTouch - Touch Typing Tutor is part of the KDE project. It is also available on SourceForge, though that repository seems to be outdated. Since the SourceForge page has a picture of a Hebrew keyboard, I hope that Hebrew is supported. Klavaro Touch Typing Tutor is available for a variety of ...


1

Here's a transliteration engine for Indian languages. https://www.cdac.in/index.aspx?id=mlc_gist_trans Here's a transliteration engine for Hebrew. http://opensiddur.org/help/transliterate/ (everything is in Google if you know how to ask) :)


1

There are two big issues outside of 'r' and 'kh' sounds: Vowel length. English speakers tend to have much longer vowel sounds than Hebrew speakers. Shorten your vowels. Another aspect of pronunciation that many don't think about is the speed at which you speak. You could have perfect ר and ח, but if you speak at a snail's space, then you will still stick ...


1

The best free Hebrew site that I have found and like to use is Teach Me Hebrew. In addition, Learn Hebrew Pod has many free lessons.


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