16

This is what I used: o kama sona e toki pona! (on Tokipona.net). It's one of the most popular courses, although there are a few points that differ from Sonja's recent book (for example, the use of "e" after "kepeken"). There's also Toki Pona in 76 Lessons (PDF file), but it's been quite a while since I looked through that one; if I recall correctly there ...


14

It takes much more time to find the translation in a paper dictionary than in a digital dictionary. So, your subconscious could "think": "It took so much time to find the meaning of that word - it would be better not to forget the meaning of that word". While you will be searching for the particular word, you will be unconsciously preparing for learning and ...


13

I found this 112 page Toki Pona instructional booklet, covering everything from the alphabet to more advanced concepts, like words for thematic vocabulary or living things. It seems to be one of the most comprehensive guides out there, if you're really into learning Toki Pona. The official Toki Pona website also might be a useful resource, as it includes ...


13

The advantage of an online dictionary is pretty clear: fast lookup, more information and media for an entry, always updated, zero weight, sharable, free. In fact, for the purpose of looking up a word solely, I believe that there is no way a physical dictionary is better than its digital counterpart. In fact, all of the reasons of the link you gave cannot buy ...


9

The best paper dictionaries are created by teams of linguists (people with a degree in linguistics) based on a text corpus. You can usually find out who created the dictionary. With online dictionaries and dictionary apps, it is often much less clear who created the entries, what the competence of the dictionary compilers is and what sources they used to ...


9

Finding such a dictionary in open-source format is unlikely, due to the labor-intensive nature of composing dictionaries. Your two best bets are probably: Wiktionary. You can download the entire Wiktionary. Depending on your precise needs, and scripting skills, you may be able to coerce it into a usable format for your needs. Any sufficiently old ...


8

This question makes a number of questionable assumptions: It assumes that "[to] have" is a "simple word". It isn't. When you look up "have" in a learner's dictionary such as the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, you get 25 different meanings. And that's just a learner's dictionary. (There are many more meanings or usages than the auxiliary verb and "to ...


6

If it is about translating words from transliterated arabic, this "fuzzy arabic dictionary" is quite good. It is also able to tell you that "lahu" is probably "لَهُ" and means something like "to or for him", but does not allow you to translate whole sentences.


6

Actually macOS / OS X comes with the "Dictionary" app built in. This however is not obvious because it is not promoted and by default only the English dictionary is activated. You find the Dictionary app easily in your Applications folder or using Spotlight. But to use other languages than English you need to go to the Dictionary app's preferences. There ...


5

There is no such complete dictionary because there are more than 20 dialects of the Arabic language. Every Arabic country has its own dialect. In addition, there is a way (it doesn't always work) to know the right translation for an "informal" word like "بحكي" but that requires having prolific Arabic vocabulary. For instance: if you take the word "بحكي", ...


5

Reverso (diacritics and romanization, including of conjugations) Wiktionary (diacritics and romanization, including of conjugations) Dict (diacritics and romanization) Bab.la (diacritics and romanization) Almaany (diacritics) Lane (diacritics) ArabicLexicon (collection of classical dictionaries, some with diacritics) Dicts (romanization) Alpheios ...


4

(I apologize for an informal answer, but this is what really matters for a language learner) The difference between those is the amount of useful information per volume, when usefulness is defined per reader. A learner needs just a brief information, not getting very deep in details. Imagine that you need a basic info about a word or a term, and instead ...


4

Retaining vocabulary is great for those who are learning a new language and helps with writing and reading. With retaining your vocabulary instead of forgetting vocabulary, you are also retaining fluency. You should always strive to be more fluent within a language, that includes knowing a lot of vocab, what they mean, and when/how to use them properly. If ...


4

The difference between them is the tradeoff between the level of the words used in the definitions. A simple definition is well... simple. It uses low level words in order to easily convey definitions of words that can be understood by most people. Lots of times this is preferred though the definition is "not as precise". This type of definition is used by ...


4

In order to advance in the levels of a language, you may follow the classic approach: follow a path of only learning, going step by step in one or several courses. But, besides this one, you could also inmerse yourself in an environment where the target language is daily used, and with perseverance and motivation you will advance. But you could follow ...


4

It's difficult to maintain interest in a text which is beyond your level, and you cannot learn words easily from context. It's a long and slow slog, looking up each word in the dictionary. However, when starting from a beginner level and progressing into early intermediate level, all available texts (newspapers, books) are too advanced. This creates an ...


4

Linguists who study vocabulary acquisition have looked at different "coverage levels" (% of known words) to investigate the relationship between coverage and adequate comprehension. Hu and Nation (2000) found: 80% coverage no reader achieved adequate comprehension 90% coverage a few achieved adequate comprehension 95% coverage some did but most did not (...


4

I couldn't find any with diacritics, but these dictionaries all indicate pronunciation of each word by romanization: Hayyim (Persian-English) Steingass (Persian-English; also via Alpheios) Wiktionary (Persian-English) Vajehyab (Persian) Wiktionary is the only one with pronunciation of conjugated verbs.


4

In addition to ba's answer, vajehyab.com and dictionary.abadis.ir, which are not dictionaries by themselves, but provide you access to دهخدا, معین and عمید which are major contemporary Persian-Persian dictionaries. and دهخدا and معین do in fact show the diacritics, though not in a usual way. i.e. they only shows the letters that do have a diacritic (in ...


3

Dictionary creators who are not trained in linguistics or lexicography are in good company. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) created his A Dictionary of the English Language between the years 1746 and 1755 (year of publication). Johnson was not trained in linguistics or lexicography; he never finished university because he ran out of money. Johnson used ...


3

There are quite a few - and they're not really hard to come by. This answer cannot be an exhaustive survey of the Greek dictionary landscape, however it can get you started and past your first learning assignments. First and foremost, consider the Liddell Scott Jones, which is GRE-ENG and a major authority. It's available in most Classics Libraries and has ...


3

I found a few that may be useful, depending on what you want to do: Manuel Bueno's Spanish-English-Spanish XML dictionary consists of a Spanish-English and an English-Spanish XML file. The licence is Apache 2.0, which is very liberal. Elliot Cooper's Spanish_Dictionary for Kindle has source files that may be useful. The project is available under the GPL 2 ...


3

a simple definition is still a definition, and it should define the word correctly. I'd shy away from "correctly" and say instead that the simple definition is intended to define the word acceptably. In your example, one difference you can see is that the full definition tries harder to express the exact connotation and use of the word. It might ...


3

What you posted (انا بحكي) isn't colloquial Arabic it is more or less a dialect which is more or less wide spread in countries like Syria, Egypt and middle east one would easily understand and use this, as it is more common, but in Gulf states and Iraq one might even say something like "انا بحتشي" or "انا احتشي" or even a more local use would be ""انا بسولف ...


3

Of course there are the obvious advantages: a paper dictionary doesn't require any electricity or internet connection, and it won't crash due to some hardware or software glitch (as my dictionary apps often do). But another thing I like about paper dictionaries is that when I look up a word, I see the words directly above and below it as well. These words ...


3

You can try this list generated by a Wiktionary user from the data at the website’s translation tables. There’s a page for each letter, but it shouldn’t be too hard to put them all together.


3

One that I have used is Diccionario didáctico de español intermedio by Juan Antonio de las Heras Fernández and Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Madrid: Ediciones SM, 1993; third edition 1994 (and now out of print). This dictionary is 1296 pages long, contains 100,000 definitions and there is an example sentence for every definition. To illustrate the level of the ...


2

There are at least two English language Toki Pona video course on Youtube. I'm pointing you here to the first video of both series: Learn toki pona in a fortnight: Day 1. 12 Days of sona pi toki pona Day One: Reading and Whatnot.


2

Your issue starts with the dictionary you use as it seems, as instead of trying to explain the actual meaning it pretends to propose many synonyms which actually are not, as they may only apply in a certain context. Also as other pointed out the dictionary calls words verbs which actually are not. Please note I'm not good at explaining Arabic grammar based ...


2

If you are translating to have in order to learn conjugation then you do not need to do it. Conjugation doesn't work in Arabic as it does in English. there is no such thing as auxiliaries, not as they are used in English at least. As for the different meanings, the link you posted is poorly constructed, because عندك (indaka) is actually not a verb, it is a ...


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