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A quick search reveals that there are several online Greek learning courses. Rosetta Stone has a Greek course that you can purchase for $189 USD in CD-ROM format, online, or as a desktop download. If you'd prefer more personal lessons, you can take Skype lessons with a Greek tutor. Eleni Pateraki, according to over 450 reviews, has an average rating of ...


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Emphatically yes! I studied computer engineering and philosophy. Here's an experience I had: When I was traveling in Athens, I was able to guess that πανεπιστήμιο (the name of a subway stop) was "pan-epistimio", meaning something like "all [kinds of] knowledge". It actually means university. In philosophy, epistemic means having to do with knowledge. In math,...


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Clozemaster might be useful for learning Greek once you have the basics down with something like Duolingo or Memrise (both free resources suitable for beginners). The goal is to learn vocab in context by answering the missing word for thousands of sentences. There's a text input mode so you can practice correct spelling, and you can play with translations in ...


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Here are some textbooks found online for self-study of Classical Greek. All of them are English books which have exercises included. Most of them are only in Attic, but I marked those which I could tell included other dialects. Based on Xenophon: Alpha Beginner's Greek Book Elementary Greek Based on readings (from classical sources or original): Athenaze ...


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Mathematical notation is a home to a great number of mnemonics, though they are mostly useful if one is fluent in mathematics, physics, statistics, or a related field. For example: Capital sigma, short for sum, is used in sum notation. Capital pi is used in the much rarer product notation. Capital delta is used for change in elementary mechanics and ...


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A very good dictionary is available online: Dictionary of Standard Modern Greek (Triantafyllides) I don't know of a dictionary that is targeted specifically to people learning Greek. Perhaps somebody else does. The Oxford dictionary (Stavropoulos) is targeted to Greek speakers who learn English. There are many other dictionaries on the market, both ...


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There are quite a few - and they're not really hard to come by. This answer cannot be an exhaustive survey of the Greek dictionary landscape, however it can get you started and past your first learning assignments. First and foremost, consider the Liddell Scott Jones, which is GRE-ENG and a major authority. It's available in most Classics Libraries and has ...


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I know Greek but, linguistics is not my subject, nor physics. So please provide feedback upon spotting mistakes. I believe that knowing physics / mathematics / medicine really helps in learning Greek language, and vice versa. Knowing the structural blocks of the language, helps a lot in finding the meaning of words you see for the first time (just by ...


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As a native Greek speaker I would say that it makes it easier knowing a lot of words that originate from the Greek language. But apart from a head-start in vocabulary and some extra confidence do not expect it to be easy and/or quick to learn the language. Greek is one of the most difficult languages to learn. It takes about 44 weeks or 1100 hours. See ...


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I can't speak for Greek, but it's definitely made learning Cyrillic based languages (Mongolian, Ukrainian and Russian) easier for me. It meant I had letters I could recognize, and also that I had experience in learning letters. I found my brain better wired for learning these kind of letters than the hiragana and katakana letters from Japanese.


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You should consider the fact that the Greek and Latin alphabets have many common characters. Also you could see Greek words and their pronunciation(this helped me memorize the cyrillic alphabet a lot.)


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I had the same struggle when I was learning English. I did was using the language 24/7. I was thinking in my head in English. I changed language settings to English on my phone, laptop and anything that I could change. Also, I watched a lot of reality shows and tv shows to learn how people speak, and I repeated whatever phrases they said. Also, I was hanging ...


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This is just my personal experience... You will not run into many "Ancient Greek" speakers. If your goal is translate text, and that text is in Ancient Greek, then I would concentrate my time on learning to read and translate text vs, conversational (modern) Greek. Learning the modern meaning/usage of a word does not provide accuracy if your ...


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The LXX only ever translates YHWH to: κύριος ὁ θεὸς κύριος ὁ θεὸς Supposing there is a case of a fragment using paleo-Hebrew to write the name, it would obviously not use Greek case endings. Case would be implied by context.


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Although I'm not sure if any of the resources I've listed will be able to answer your question, WordReference fairly well. Make sure you select Greek-English in the drop-down box below the search bar. Dict also offers a Greek-English dictionary, and Glosbe works as well.


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Here is a a dictionary I just discovered, it is monolingual and specifically oriented towards people learning Greek as a foreign language as it can be deduced from the title: Λεξικό της ελληνικής ως ξένης γλώσσας για μαθητές της δευτεροβάθμιας εκπαίδευσης It is not for complete beginners, of course. I have looked through a couple definitions and they ...


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Memrise also has some Greek courses: https://www.memrise.com/courses/english/greek/


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