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12

This is a non-scientific answer from a native Ukrainian. I have deliberately removed everything that is not related to language learning, e.g. explanations, historical references, and my extraordinarily important thoughts. :) UA is arguably more phonemic, hence easier to read. Most prominently, this includes vowels in unstressed syllables; they retain their ...


9

I am going to assume that your native language is a Germanic language (English or German?). The CEFR or CEFRL describes skill levels for four skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. At CEFR level B2 you should have the following abilities (quoted from Wikipedia): Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract ...


8

Free Duolingo is an immensely popular language learning platform, and they released their Russian course for English speakers around 8 months ago. I have experience with Duolingo, and can attest to the quality of their courses in general, but I've not tried their Russian course. Usually, Duolingo courses focus more on vocabulary than grammar. Memrise I also ...


7

Learn to Read Russian in 15 Minutes by Peter Starr Northrop and Ryan Estrada uses a number of mnemonics. For example, Д is a dancer, Р is an R with a leg ripped off, П is a podium that makes a p sound, etcetera. The page is available under the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike licence (CC BY-NC-SA).


7

The Russian term for "graded reader" would be something like "Хрестоматия по русскому языку для студентов-иностранцев" or "адаптированные тексты для студентов-иностранцев". Or "книги для чтения" (для студентов-иностранцев) I'm a native speaker so I don't use these. Yet I've Googled it and I found this https://www.kniga.de/knigi/russkiy-yazyk/russkiy-yazyk-...


6

Unless you can dedicate 100% of the time of the next 14 days (14 × 24 = 336 hours) to learning Russian, your goal is effectively impossible. As mentioned in the comments, your goal is to attain B1 fluency (A2 if we're being lenient with our definitions) in 14 hours of study. A2 fluency is attained at ~200 hours of study. B1 takes more than 300 hours. ...


6

I think this article has a lot of good tips for you. Even though some of the tips are about accent, many of the tips aren't. And frankly, if you want to sound like a native, then accent is absolutely part of the equation, so I wouldn't disregard it if I were you. In addition to your clear need for speaking to a variety of natives in order to increase your ...


5

There are several things you can do. Gabriel Wyner's book Fluent Forever advises using flashcards (e.g. in Anki): on the "front", you put a sentence using the verb form you want to learn but you leave out the verb; the "back" then has the conjugated verb (or the whole sentence), possibly with a note about the verb (e.g. the infinitive and/or the root). In ...


5

The Test of Russian as a Foreign Language or TORFL has six levels that are mapped to the six levels of the CEFR. So the Second Level Certificate (TORFL-II) in the TORFL should correspond to B2 in the CEFR. According to the Russian Language Centre in the UK, which also administers TORFL tests, the number of hours of study required to pass TORFL-II is ...


5

Memrise has several courses that focus solely on the Russian alphabet and provides mnemonics plus the ability to add your own. Some are better than others so I suggest trying a few briefly before you settle on one that you like. The "Speed Review" feature is also particularly suited to learning alphabets. You can learn the whole alphabet very fast just by ...


5

Assuming that your first language is English, or another Romance or Germanic language. According to Foreign Service Institute it takes 1100 class hours to learn Russian language to achieve level 3 in reading and speaking. I would say that level 3 is close enough to B2, but you can judge for yourself (ILR skill level descriptions - click on the links at the ...


5

You can't do all of that in two weeks. You could get proficient progress in some parts, but not all. Like mentioned lots of times here, not only must you practice and learn new words, you must use them in some ways. Learning only one hour a day for a total of 14 hours will only let you remember a few words. That is not enough for you to remember and use ...


4

I made a monster post of 100 top resources to learn Russian over at the LinguaLift Blog, categorized by type and proficiency level.


4

My approach has always been to increase input - this will automatically improve your output without you having to make a conscious effort. In practical terms it means increasing your exposure to the language and culture in any possible ways, i.e. passive listening and watching as much real life material as you can without making any effort to actually ...


4

The German publisher dtv has published a number of bilingual Russian-German books for learners of Russian. Below are a few example titles: Einfach Russisch lesen ("Simply read Russian"), edited by Natalija Nossowa (2015). Erste russische Lesestücke, edited by Gisela & Michael Wachinger (1991). Russland in kleinen Geschichten ("Russia in short/small ...


4

Short answer: Knowledge of Spanish would not help much while learning Russian. Long answer: It could be easier for you to learn a second foreign language, but it's impossible to quantify it, as @Tsundoku mentioned. Also individual mileage may vary. If you asked about another language in the Romance group (e.g. Italian, French, etc.) then it would be ...


3

I have not heard of standardized lists of verbs in any language, except for word lists that you need to learn for specific language tests (especially HSK for Standard Chinese). The type of resource that comes closest to what you need is probably a frequency dictionary. This type of dictionary contains words ordered by frequency instead of alphabetically. ...


3

I was a bit socially awkward when growing up. (Maybe I still am, but that's a topic for another day.) Anyway, when I was in junior high school, and I finally found a small group of mixed gender students in my grade that gravitated to each other, I often found myself feeling tongue-tied, unable to find anything to talk about on the spur of the moment. Then ...


3

Memorize some interesting and idiomatic correct sentences (or short, pithy remarks) that can work for a variety of purposes. Use them as often as you can, with great emotion and engagement. The Russians will be tickled. Also, you gotta work on your Russian at home, so that you keep encountering new vocabulary and stock phrases. When you run into something ...


3

I considered myself "good" at language learning before I came to Japan as an adult, aged 34, in 1985. I felt extremely awkward trying to speak, and lacked the sense of adventure and discovery of a new "identity" that I felt when I learned French, in particular, and Spanish to some extent. You have to be able to embrace the language you are learning as ...


3

I had previously learned the Greek alphabet before learning the Cyrillic one. Being able to mentally map Cyrillic letters to their corresponding Greek ones was helpful to me. Г = Γ Д = Δ Л = Λ П = Π Р = Ρ С = Σ У = Υ Ф = Φ Х = Χ If you see the Cyrillic С not as a weird version of the Roman C that somehow always sounds like an S, but see it as a Greek Sigma ...


3

Czech is member of Western Slavic group, Russian is Eastern, the book you have (I assume Croatian?) is Southern Slavic group. They are quite different. Did you tried to understand some Czech? Explanation of Russian grammar in Czech might be confusing. Did you considered http://steen.free.fr/interslavic/index.html - "Slavic Esperanto" as a starting point? ...


2

The short answer is yes, it is totally possible. I can state that based on my personal experience. I just passed B2 level exam in Danish with a good average (8,25). It took me 3 years (42 weeks per year, 5-15 hours per week; in total around 1300 hours). And I am native in Russian, thought my English is at B2-C2 level (as I have never tested it after I ...


2

I wont't surprise you with the answer, that only practice in handwriting could help you to improve your handwriting. Moreover, you need to explain, what do you need Russian for :) In case you need to understand written text, speak and understand spoken speech, there's actually no need to learn Russian handwriting. We live in an digital century. I think it'...


2

One inexpensive Russian grammar text in which you will find the vowel reduction rules for Russian is the Schaum's Outline Series Russian Grammar. If the book is not in bookstores near you, you will find it available (in English) from either Amazon.com, Amazon.uk.com, or Amazon.de. If you search for the Schaum's Outline grammar on any of the above Amazon ...


2

There are several books that may help you: John Murray & Sarah Smyth: Intermediate Russian: A Grammar and Workbook. Second edition. Routledge, 2013. ISBN 9780415698245. 276 pages. This book contains 18 chapters that consist of grammar explanations followed by grammar exercises. There is an answer key at the book at the book, which makes the book ...


2

Very advisable in my opinion as a native speaker. And it's not very difficult, because gender in Russian is signified with the ending. This should simplify their inflexion for you, since there're differences in inflexion of words of different genders. And also will give you an idea of correct agreement of adjectives and verbs because they all have a ...


1

If you are learning the Russian language you might find the no-cost Google translator app (at translate.google.com) to be a helpful tool. To illustrate only a few of the app's features I've made a sample English to Russian translation. Of significance is that the Google translator provides a transliteration of the Russian text. To illustrate, here is a ...


1

I don't know how Babbel's vocabulary trainer works, but for vocabulary, a spaced repetition system like Anki works great (free android app). We already have few answers about Anki and spaced repetition. Anki website also has many free shared decks, and you can add own words. If Babbel does not allow adding new words it would be of little use after basic ...


1

This is an addition to Chistophe's answer. I have not seen the formal list of such verbs. However, from learning through Pimsleur audio classes I noticed that some verbs and words are usable in a wider variety of situations than others. For example: "understand" is more useful than "speak". "can" and "want" can be used in multiple situations, e.g. I can. ...


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