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8

This question makes a number of questionable assumptions: It assumes that "[to] have" is a "simple word". It isn't. When you look up "have" in a learner's dictionary such as the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, you get 25 different meanings. And that's just a learner's dictionary. (There are many more meanings or usages than the auxiliary verb and "to ...


6

What I can recommend is Glosario de voces ibéricas y latinas usadas entre los mozárabes by Don Francisco Javier Simonet. Although it focuses on Mozarabic rather than [Old] Spanish, it has a lot of information about the use of Arabic letters in Romance languages in Iberia. You might find the section titled Advertencias preliminares (page ccxv) particularly ...


6

If it is about translating words from transliterated arabic, this "fuzzy arabic dictionary" is quite good. It is also able to tell you that "lahu" is probably "لَهُ" and means something like "to or for him", but does not allow you to translate whole sentences.


6

The variant of Arabic you are looking for appears to be Gulf Arabic, which is spoken "around the coasts of the Persian Gulf in Kuwait, Iraq, Bahrain, eastern Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Iran and northern Oman" (quoted from Wikipedia; emphasis added). There are regional variations in Gulf Arabic, though, so for any course or resource for ...


5

First, you're referring to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Second, there is this famous FSI Arabic Course. It is quite comprehensive over several volumes. Here are some grammar books with exercises: Easy Arabic Grammar Arabic Grammar: A First Workbook Basic Arabic: A Grammar and Workbook Arabic Grammar in Context Arabic in 10 Minutes a Day Here are some ...


5

There is no such complete dictionary because there are more than 20 dialects of the Arabic language. Every Arabic country has its own dialect. In addition, there is a way (it doesn't always work) to know the right translation for an "informal" word like "بحكي" but that requires having prolific Arabic vocabulary. For instance: if you take the word "بحكي", ...


4

I am a non Arabic speaking person from India and have learned Quranic Arabic around 20 year ago. I will tell you from my personal experience. I took around 2 years for learning complete Quran. I had gone through some basic Arabic lessons before I started learning Quran. Back then I didn't have computers or Internet to help me. I used Abdullah Yusuf Ali ...


4

If you have an Android device, you might want to use this app, which has very positive reviews. It claims to start from the basics of beginning Arabic to more advanced concepts to help you better read and understand the Qur'an. You can download it here from the App Store. This resource is a web-based application that starts from the alphabet and develops ...


4

I'm answering your question based on the Arabic alphabet! You should try to learn the letters based on their position in a word! Learning a couple of words might help for the start, but isn't a good solution. As usually when we learn this alphabet we learn all the styles of writing any of the letters according all possible cases: For example: For the ...


4

There is few dialects are well understood in most Arabic speaking countries, Egyptian is not the only one. There is also the Syrian dialect (Lebanese and Jordanian are so close/similar). Egyptian movies and songs are so popular, and that helps Arabic speaking people to get used to it and understand it. The same for Syrian dialect, Syrian songs and ...


4

Reverso (diacritics and romanization, including of conjugations) Wiktionary (diacritics and romanization, including of conjugations) Dict (diacritics and romanization) Bab.la (diacritics and romanization) Almaany (diacritics) Lane (diacritics) ArabicLexicon (collection of classical dictionaries, some with diacritics) Dicts (romanization) Alpheios ...


3

It doesn't matter which keyboard type you use the main difference is the latin layout: azerty, qwerty or qwertz. In all cases all Arabic letters and diacritics would be present on the Keyboard in any case! For example, a Moroccan (Arabic) Keyboard will be on or beside a French Keyboard (azerty), while in the middle east or gulf states it would be an English ...


3

If your main focus is on accent reduction, then one method would be to listen to native speakers and attempt to reproduce what they are saying. If you don't have anyone you can talk to in Arabic, then you could seek audio resources on the internet. Find a video or podcast, play the audio briefly, then pause it and try to repeat what you've heard as closely ...


3

Here is a poem that is irreligious but not classic per say. This poem is good for beginners; they taught us this in grade 2 at the Libyan school. Basic knowledge of the Arabic language is required to read and understand these line انا عصفور صغير .....حيثما شئت اطير وعلي الغصن اغني .....وعلي الارض اسير ان يكن راسي صغير ..... فبه عقلا كبير ان امي علمتني........


3

What you posted (انا بحكي) isn't colloquial Arabic it is more or less a dialect which is more or less wide spread in countries like Syria, Egypt and middle east one would easily understand and use this, as it is more common, but in Gulf states and Iraq one might even say something like "انا بحتشي" or "انا احتشي" or even a more local use would be ""انا بسولف ...


2

As included in their definition, "broken plurals" in arabic are irregular. As a consequence, no single rule can allow you to master them. What's more, they sometimes differ so much from the singular that the word is difficult to recognize if you only know its singular form. As frustrating as it may seem, I think the only way to memorize these plurals is to ...


2

Strictly speaking, the idea behind the concept of language exchange is not that you teach! Doing a language exchange assumes—in your case—that you have at least a basic knowledge of Arabic and that your partner has at least a basic knowledge of Spanish. A typical way of doing a language exchange is that you speak the language of one of the partners in the ...


2

Arabic is somewhat different from Spanish. Arabic has diglossia. Everyone writes in a standardized way - Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). But they speak differently. Differences between Levantine dialect and MSA include: Difference in vocabulary Levantine conjugates verbs against 8 pronouns MSA conjugates verbs against 14 pronouns. Not only the number of ...


2

Your issue starts with the dictionary you use as it seems, as instead of trying to explain the actual meaning it pretends to propose many synonyms which actually are not, as they may only apply in a certain context. Also as other pointed out the dictionary calls words verbs which actually are not. Please note I'm not good at explaining Arabic grammar based ...


2

If you are translating to have in order to learn conjugation then you do not need to do it. Conjugation doesn't work in Arabic as it does in English. there is no such thing as auxiliaries, not as they are used in English at least. As for the different meanings, the link you posted is poorly constructed, because عندك (indaka) is actually not a verb, it is a ...


2

I don't think there's a difference in keyboards. There are maybe differences in word usage (but even though Arabic is my L1, I don't know of any). Dialects are another story since they're almost completely different in each country. I personally use this since I don't know the arabic keyboard by heart: http://www.lexilogos.com/clavier/araby.htm It is quite ...


2

Disclaimer, I am not an expert in Arabic literature, but being from Lebanon, Arabic is my mother tongue. So this is only from experience. Yes, knowing how to read the Arabic alphabet can help you more in pronunciation. Using Arabish is still possible but you won't be able to get the pronunciation 100% correctly all the time. There are 2 main problems with ...


2

Others have already mentioned Egyptian due to its media and cinema. Definitely the most widely understood dialect (reciprocal comprehension is something else). The situation is definitely changing overall in recent years. With the Internet and mass movement of people, even dialects that were previously considered "obscure" and difficult are becoming more ...


2

The Swadesh List for Egyptian Arabic is probably too short since it contains only 207 words, but other resources for Egyptian Arabic are heard to find. There are a few resources for Arabic in general that may be useful: A Frequency Dictionary of Arabic by Tim Buckwalter and Dilworth Parkinson (Routledge, 2011, 580 pages). This book provides "a list of the 5,...


1

The Swadesh List, available on Wiktionary, has many of the most common words. Another advantage is that you can compare any word with those of MSA and other Arabic dialects (or nearly any language, for that matter). There's not a great frequency-sorted list specific to Egyptian that I'm aware of, but Lughatuna has a good English-Egyptian dictionary that you ...


1

ar-EG Arabic (Egypt) The Egyptian dialect is the most common for two reasons. First, it's the largest Arabic-speaking country in the world. Second, it's the main producer of Arabic language entertainment (tv, movies, music). Keep in mind, though, that written Arabic is almost always Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), which is not on your list.


1

The Arabs are concerned about the dialect closest to the classical Arabic language between the Arab countries and their peoples, but according to the linguists there is no confirmed fact and what is rumored about Arab confessions, in what area is wrong and not documented. But it can be said that the dialect of the Levant, Syria, Jordan and modern Palestine, ...


1

There are resources for Levantine Arabic, but not necessarily "interactive". Mohammad Al-Masri: Colloquial Arabic (Levantine): The Complete Course for Beginners. Routledge, 2016. (book) Leslie J McLoughlin: Colloquial Arabic (Levantine). Routledge, 2009. (60-minute CD) Ernest N McCarus; Hamdi A Qafisheh; Raji M Rammuny: A course in Levantine Arabic. Ann ...


1

I don't think that you'll find a good En-Ar dictionary. In the link you provided, there are several words, that serve the same meaning. يملك = to have (for properties, features..) يملك منزلاً he has a house يملك القدرة على التعلم بسرعة = he has the ability to learn fast but for things like a book, a wash machine, and also for relatives, one uses عنده ...


1

There are minor differences between existing standard keyboards for typing Arabic. However,the common problem is that all of them are difficult to use even by native speakers of Arabic. No serious attempt has been made to improve this key question. One very promising design that could replace actual standards can be found in this link: https://www....


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