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There are several questions in one. Let me focus on plurals first. First things first: from personal experience communicating with Thai native speakers, many would skip the -s simply because of phonetic difficulty, especially in endings like -ms or -ngs. See if this is the case; maybe you needn't go any further. If the above does not work, several techniques ...


2

Teaching the present continuous first would make sense for highly inflected languages like Spanish. You only need to learn six present-tense conjugations of the verb estar (to be) according to person, number and formality plus the progressive of each verb. Supposing you have five verbs to learn, you only have to memorize 11 words in all to form every ...


2

Norway is among top countries in the world for English L2 proficiency, but an American told me that he'd heard many Norwegians using present progressive incorrectly, e.g. saying "I'm living here" when it's supposed to be "I live here". On the other hand, I'm sure that a majority of Norwegians could pass a C2 English exam without much ...


2

(Note: I am writing the response in an impersonal form only to make it generic across learners.) I would break the problem down into three parts: awareness, learning the correct forms (conjugations) and using these forms in the appropriate context (the actual tenses). Awareness here refers to what tenses are required most (i.e. not generally but by the ...


1

Sort of answering my own question here. Unless someone else posts, for the time being here is the best website I have found. It should be noted that I asked for a cheat sheet, whereas what I was looking for was a summary. The problem is I had rote learnt every single one of the tiempos verbales, even the irregular ones, but I never understood where or when ...


1

I own a cheatsheet like this in German: Zeiten auf einen Blick Spanisch by the German publisher PONS (ISBN 978-3-12-562829-8). It is the size of three A4 sheets folded together and laminated, so you get 6 A4 pages in total. The first page explains the use of use of the present tense (and the gerund, e.g. estoy hablando); the next page and a half explains ...


1

This is something that often happens to beginners, but since you say your wife is quite advanced, I'm surprised, as her mother tongue does have tense inflection. But this is something that can be used to her advantage. I'd suggest creating flashcards from Spanish to English with the verbs most frequently occurring in the spoken language, separate for each ...


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