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While not as good as a real pronunciation coach, one thing that helps me go beyond just trying to replicate someone else making a particular sound until they go "yes, that's it", a technique that is frustrating at best, is the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The best resource for it would be https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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this extension does a bit more than translate words (it immerses you in vocab by switching a few words on every page to your target language), but it also does offer pronunciation. In general I've found it to be a great resource for taking vocab from the initial "learned" stage, to the "fluent" stage. Hope it helps!


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We don't know why Microsoft did so unless Microsoft makes an official press release about its reasoning. However, it seems easy to speculate why it would be beneficial for a native language speaker to know foreign accents. Here's my try, not very scientific, rather based on my experience. The key reason to learning foreign languages is obtaining an ability ...


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I would search the internet for "How to speak English with an (insert your native tongue here) accent." Let us say your native tongue is German. Searching "How to speak English with a German accent" pulls up a website that tells you that German speakers have a non-English "R" as well as other common errors in pronunciation ...


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Your question relates directly to what is know as orthographic depth. If a language has a shallow orthography then there is a close correspondence (and, importantly, a reliable correspondence) between the way that the word is written and the way that it is pronounced. In contrast, a language with a deep orthography has a poorer (and less reliable) ...


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I would recommend for an exercise of building up word meaningful word combinations of "gn" and "gh" using the student's own effort and make a conscious effort to remember how every word is pronounced. That way it would be much more useful to internalize the patterns than to memorize rules(Memorizing rules, in my own experience makes the ...


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(I have some experience with this type of work, but not enough to necessarily know best practices.) Using this webpage as an example, the general rules that are taught are: gn is consistently /n/ when it begins a word. As per this ELL.SE post, it is pronounced /gn/ if it appears at a syllable boundary, but not if what follows is a suffix. gh at the end of ...


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The pitch accent is often forgotten in Japanese lessons, but is very important. Japanese have many similar words differentiated only by pitch accent. The Takoboto Android app can display the pitch accent. You have to activate it in the settings. Sometimes, you have two different pitch accents because it can vary from a region to another. https://play.google....


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Natives do not pronounce consistently Even languages spoken in only a single, small country often have dialects. Which are you going to learn? Learning pronunciation is not always easy This depends on the skills of the person, of the language(s) they can speak with native-like accent, and of the target language. Learning native pronunciation of English ...


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I have no experience with the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, but the free online dictionaries on the Larousse website may be useful. In particular: The monolingual French dictionary has a sample pronunciation of the canonical form and links to synonyms. It does also have examples of usage, but there is no audio sample for those. The bilingual ...


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