12 votes
Accepted

What's the name of this non-IPA phonetic notation?

Apparently it's called the "American Heritage Dictionary representation" (AHD), essentially identical to the one used on Wiktionary, called the "English Phonemic Representation"(enPR). It has a ...
kristan's user avatar
  • 766
10 votes

What advantages, if any, are there for learning the IPA when studying a language with phonetic spelling?

Learning IPA is useful if you want to learn the pronunciation of words from a dictionary. However, IPA is less useful in the following cases (non-exhaustive list): You are using dictionaries that ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 19.7k
9 votes

Pros and cons of using IPA over other phonetic alphabets

The only phonetic alphabet I know of that is comparable to IPA in universality and language coverage is X-SAMPA. The advantage of X-SAMPA compared to IPA, is that it contains only ASCII characters and ...
michau's user avatar
  • 2,304
8 votes

What advantages, if any, are there for learning the IPA when studying a language with phonetic spelling?

While the IPA is an invaluable tool for English even if you're a native speaker, in languages spelled phonetically it's mostly useful for the initial stages and there's no reason to keep using IPA ...
escargot agile's user avatar
6 votes

How to learn the pronunciation of ejectives?

The way I learned is as follows: Train yourself to become aware of your glottis and perform a glottal stop at will. You can train pronouncing 'uh-oh' and observing what happens between those syllabes....
zefciu's user avatar
  • 583
5 votes

How can one learn a language (such as Korean), when there is no agreement as to how to properly pronounce it?

I think you should consider some minimal pair training and then see whether the problem you describe still persists. Wikipedia defines minimal pairs as pairs of words or phrases in a particular ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 19.7k
5 votes

What advantages, if any, are there for learning the IPA when studying a language with phonetic spelling?

Few languages are 100% phonetic. Even Spanish has oddities in a few foreign words which retain their foreign spelling, words from indigenous American languages, etc. Also letters have subtle ...
hippietrail's user avatar
5 votes

Pros and cons of using IPA over other phonetic alphabets

IPA is the best choice for pronunciation transcription. IPA has a long history of development (since 1886) and represents best scientific practice. This means the system is concise, unambiguous and ...
gavenkoa's user avatar
  • 804
4 votes

Polish affricates learning tips

(I'm going to repost the answer I gave for a dulilngo question of similar nature) When you first encounter a foreign language, you also encounter sounds that you are not used to. That your ears aren'...
Arie's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

How can one learn a language (such as Korean), when there is no agreement as to how to properly pronounce it?

Millions of people speak Korean and not everyone pronounces every sound the same way or knows the same vocabulary, yet they have no problem with communicating between each other. The same happens in ...
Locoluis's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

How can one learn a language (such as Korean), when there is no agreement as to how to properly pronounce it?

I've faced the same difficulty with my Dutch. I was fortunate enough to come across Bruce Donaldson's Dutch: A Comprehensive Grammar. Despite its chapter on pronunciation being rather short, this book ...
J. Siebeneichler's user avatar
3 votes

Having trouble with English vowels

Because of the nature of a text-based site, it's near impossible for me to help you distinguish those sounds when you hear them beyond what you could read elsewhere, but I can help a little bit in ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 156
3 votes
Accepted

How to train yourself to contrast heard sounds

First, exposure is important. You need to be exposed to the sounds and listen to them in natural contexts, over a period of time. Some people will pick up the sounds quicker than others, but you ...
gaeguri's user avatar
  • 1,817
3 votes

What advantages, if any, are there for learning the IPA when studying a language with phonetic spelling?

Learning IPA takes some time. If you plan to learn only one language that is mostly phonetic, it may be better to learn the sounds of the letter's combinations with examples from your source language, ...
jsksp's user avatar
  • 481
3 votes
Accepted

Is there an online resource that transliterates from IPA into different writing systems?

After several attempts to find the type of online service you are looking for, I concluded that such a resources was unlikely to exist. (However, see the end of my response.) There are several reasons ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 19.7k
1 vote

How can I make sure my pronunciation based on IPA is correct?

I'm assuming that you don't have a native speaker to assist you and you want to do this online. If that is the case, I have the following suggestion- Find an internet sound file with the ...
Karlomanio's user avatar
1 vote

How to speak a language that makes phonemic distinctions between /a/ and /aː/ if you're having trouble with /a/ and /aː/?

General advice; hopefully someone can answer with a response that takes into account the particular sounds and languages. Find a pair of words where the mentioned sounds is the only difference, or a ...
Tommi's user avatar
  • 3,477
1 vote

How can one learn a language (such as Korean), when there is no agreement as to how to properly pronounce it?

Do not rely on the flawed Korean romanization. Romanization is not transcription. Learn the IPA system. Study the phonology. Learn how to read the vowel diagrams and compare with that of your own ...
Константин Ван's user avatar
1 vote

Is there an online resource that transliterates from IPA into different writing systems?

Hard work is seldom done easily. I don't know of any commercially available computer program that will transliterate the IPA of one language into the IPA of another. However, that being said, there ...
К. Келлогг Смиф's user avatar
1 vote

How to train yourself to contrast heard sounds

One way is to get a well educated native speaker to pronounce, and contrast similar sounds. You want, not just a native speaker, but a well educated one. "Average Joes" sometimes confuse such sounds ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 1,869
1 vote

How to train yourself to contrast heard sounds

I found that pronouncing them myself was a good way to learn the difference. When I had difficulty understanding the auditory difference between two sounds, I practiced saying them out loud until I ...
Quill's user avatar
  • 968

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