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Apparently it's called the "American Heritage Dictionary representation" (AHD), essentially identical to the one used on Wiktionary, called the "English Phonemic Representation"(enPR). It has a Wikipedia page, which shows the AHD/enPR symbols matched up with words containing that sound, and with the equivalent IPA characters: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


2

Depends on the language. For Mandarin Chinese, there are (free online on edx.org) courses based on pinyin, ignoring the Chinese symbols completely. Of course being able to speak, but not being able to read, will severely limit your learning potential - but if might be a valid first step in learning Mandarin. Luckily, some/most Chinese (I heard - I have no ...


2

Well, I mean Greek is pronounced by English speakers the way an English speaker would pronounce an English word, i.e. according to English conventions. It may be possible for an English speaker to say thelta instead of delta for example, but in English a d is pronounced as /d/, so that is the natural way to pronounce it. But it is not only Greek. Take ...


1

I would recommend for an exercise of building up word meaningful word combinations of "gn" and "gh" using the student's own effort and make a conscious effort to remember how every word is pronounced. That way it would be much more useful to internalize the patterns than to memorize rules(Memorizing rules, in my own experience makes the ...


1

(I have some experience with this type of work, but not enough to necessarily know best practices.) Using this webpage as an example, the general rules that are taught are: gn is consistently /n/ when it begins a word. As per this ELL.SE post, it is pronounced /gn/ if it appears at a syllable boundary, but not if what follows is a suffix. gh at the end of ...


1

Imagine that the first thing you learn is to memorize written words such as bat, cat, rat, cod, god and dog. Only after you can read and write those words in their entirety do you start to analyze the letters in isolation. In theory, this could work. In my experience teaching Spanish and English, I find it is often easier to memorize entire phrases than ...


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