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Context I have live in Norway (a few months shy of a year) and, before that, lived for almost a year in Denmark. I have visited Sweden, though at that time I only had mostly forgotten school Swedish at my disposal. I can currently have reasonable discussions with people using any of these languages, though I occasionally have to ask what a strange word ...


3

The short answer is that if you are fluent/advanced in Norwegian and can read Bokmål, then you will be able to read Nynorsk without much trouble. In the situation that you are an intermediate reader of Bokmål, then it will be helpful if you know the major spelling differences between the two, as covered here and here. After knowing those "conversion" ...


3

The store norske leksikon has many, mostly fairly short, articles on mathematics: https://snl.no/.taxonomy/39 . They are essentially explanations of the meanings of the words with some historical background. The positive side is that the concepts are explained in text, rather than given mere translations to other languages or only definitions. Matematisk ...


3

Here are several resources for mathematics in Norwegian: Norwegian math vocabulary list (the closest to what you want) A short word list but contains example sentences You can buy professional math vocab guides here


2

The closest thing I have been able to find is the Norwegisches Lesebuch. Lesestücke in der norwegischen Reichssprache, edited by J. C. Poestion in ... 1902. Since copyright on this book has expired, it is now in the public domain and available on Archive.org. The language it represents is Riksmål. According to Wikipedia, the latest reform of Riksmål in 2005 ...


1

In my experience, it is better to reach at least B2 in one language before attempting one of its close relatives. For example, my Spanish and Mandarin have reached a point where I can dabble in French and Cantonese without confusion. If you must learn two at the same time, try to mentally separate them and use visual aids when possible. For example, make ...


1

Although I am a language learner rather than a native speaker of Danish and Norwegian, I can confidently put forward that there shouldn't be too much interference due to some evidences I have encountered. An online article written by Terri Mapes supports my decision, stating they are the most similar amongst all Scandinavian languages, the differences are ...


1

Cost is one of the obvious differences. But again, for some people (time-rich and money-poor) 3000 for such course is a significant expense. For others, it might be a smart investment to be able to earn more in the near future. It depends on how much you make per hour in Denmark now, if additional time spend making money in Denmark (as compared to ...


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