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As mentioned, you’re overgeneralizing somewhat. For example, standard Italian does not use “ll” to spell a “y” sound. "yeísmo" is the merger of the “ll” and “y” sounds in Spanish. Before this sound change, “ll” in Spanish was pronounced as a “palatal lateral approximant” consonant sound. The change to the non-lateral palatal approximant /j/, or ...


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I personally found it more practical to spend a week on each language: it takes some time to start "thinking a language" it gives time to cover whole concepts/grammatical phenomena, or make a full pass over not too complex books (such as those from "Teach yourself" or "Colloquial" series) it allows for making more meaningful ...


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I hope this helps. I'm fluent in Dhivehi (native) and English. They are very different from each other. I've tried to learn Spanish few times. On and off, but I can't seem to really go anywhere (partly because I wasn't that interested and I didn't use proper techniques). Phonetically however, the 2 languages I speak together covers almost all the sounds used ...


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This is how it could be helpful: Vocabulary overlap - knowing two languages obviously helps, if the third one borrowed from one of them (or both). Awareness of different grammatical functioning: e.g., native English speakers would struggle with Russian cases a lot more than German speakers, for whom this phenomenon is not new. Phonetical abilities: being ...


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