4

Short answer: Knowledge of Spanish would not help much while learning Russian. Long answer: It could be easier for you to learn a second foreign language, but it's impossible to quantify it, as @Tsundoku mentioned. Also individual mileage may vary. If you asked about another language in the Romance group (e.g. Italian, French, etc.) then it would be ...


3

As mentioned, you’re overgeneralizing somewhat. For example, standard Italian does not use “ll” to spell a “y” sound. "yeísmo" is the merger of the “ll” and “y” sounds in Spanish. Before this sound change, “ll” in Spanish was pronounced as a “palatal lateral approximant” consonant sound. The change to the non-lateral palatal approximant /j/, or ...


3

I personally found it more practical to spend a week on each language: it takes some time to start "thinking a language" it gives time to cover whole concepts/grammatical phenomena, or make a full pass over not too complex books (such as those from "Teach yourself" or "Colloquial" series) it allows for making more meaningful ...


2

I think that it is natural for your brain to remember a language that you learned and practiced more recently than one that you studied years ago and didn’t practice much in the meanwhile. In my opinion, everyone tends to remember the things he studied most recently rather than the ones that he/she learned in the past without revising or practicing them ...


2

First, accept that there will be some interference while beginning the new language. It is unavoidable but it diminishes over time. Second, a suggestion that has served me well: study your fourth language using material intended for native speakers of your third language (or second one), and vice versa. That way, you solidify both. You don't have to use that ...


2

I've heard this situation quite a number of times from people learning languages. Mostly they start enthusiastically about say Spanish and they suddenly stumble upon an extraordinarily gripping French TV series and their interest on Spanish's eloquence shifts to the smoothness of French. Hence they give up Spanish for a while and when they start on French, ...


2

I hope this helps. I'm fluent in Dhivehi (native) and English. They are very different from each other. I've tried to learn Spanish few times. On and off, but I can't seem to really go anywhere (partly because I wasn't that interested and I didn't use proper techniques). Phonetically however, the 2 languages I speak together covers almost all the sounds used ...


2

Can I learn all the languages simultaneously, or should I learn them one by one? Yes, you can. Do you want to learn them all simultaneously? It's easier and I think faster to learn one language first, then learn another after finishing the first. Maybe I should learn the similar languages (like Spanish and Portuguese) together, or do you suggest an order ...


2

I don’t think that there is a maximum number of languages a person can learn in general. Of course, if we are talking about efficiency, quality is better than quantity. Even so, everyone is different and unique and the same goes for their learning speed, in addition to how much time they can spend on learning. As for your question, since you have already ...


1

I learned Korean and Thai at the same time and I didn't notice it was faster than learning, say, English by itself. I think it depends on your personal psychology. If you're the type of person who doesn't get disheartened, I would say learn multiple languages at once(But be careful) I'd recommend learning from different language family trees. Say French and ...


1

This is how it could be helpful: Vocabulary overlap - knowing two languages obviously helps, if the third one borrowed from one of them (or both). Awareness of different grammatical functioning: e.g., native English speakers would struggle with Russian cases a lot more than German speakers, for whom this phenomenon is not new. Phonetical abilities: being ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible