15

Getting fluent in the full range of IPA is overkill for the most practical purposes (essentially, you only need it for phonetic transcription or documentation of unwritten languages/dialects). Instead, concentrate on the subset of IPA used in the target language you want to learn. Langenscheidt dictionaries come with handy tables in the front matter of the ...


9

As with most subjects, taking a class or receiving private tutoring is probably best. A course in phonetics will teach you not only the International Phonetic Alphabet itself but enough information to know how to use that alphabet correctly. This free online course from MIT, called "Phonology", is actually a phonetics and phonology course and covers the IPA. ...


5

The situation you are describing is called diglossia. Language A is the vernacular. The term may refer to a dialect as opposed to the literary or public forms of the same language ("African-American vernacular English"), as well as to a national language as opposed to a lingua franca (such as Latin in the medieval times).


3

For those who know German, there is an unusual set of books by Vera F. Birkenbihl and Jan Müller: Vera F. Birkenbihl & Jan Müller: Das Falschschreib-Spiel fonetix: Wir schreiben ohne Regeln frei nach Gehör. Alfa-Veda-Verlag, 2005; fourth printing 2014. ISBN 978-3945004104. This book was originally published as a supplement to Trotzdem LEHREN (Gabal, ...


3

I think it depends on what aspect of the language you're talking about. For reading and writing, English, being a primarily phonetic written language (albeit very irregular), seems to be easier to learn than Chinese. You can see the syllables written out and compare that with other words you already know. You can guess how to write something based on how ...


3

This sounds like an excellent opportunity for all sorts of self-experiments, for example: You can use vocabulary lists to investigate your forgetting curve like the German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus. You can compare the effectiveness of different ways of learning vocabulary, e.g. flashcards that use translations versus flashcards that use images (at ...


2

Frankly, I think a lot of this is embedded in the term "prestige language" as it is. Being learned later is usual for prestige languages, since they're are usually taught in school and not used at home, In fact, it took me a second to work around your question because "prestige language" equates to "more or less native" in my head. There will be people ...


1

I'm not aware of any, but would be interested as well. I used to contribute to Wikinews - and did some translations there of articles to and from english, but that typically was by myself, not collaboratively. You say your interest is in translating linguistic academic articles - I assume that you're thinking of open access, that is freely shareable and ...


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