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I think people eventually get past this problem in Japanese by learning to read in context. Most of the time you're reading at the level of words, so you don't have to make that fine distinction to recognize something. It's more of a problem with handwriting. As long as you're inputting text by typing or speech recognition, the problem doesn't really come up....


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I don't think there's any real research on that question. But there is more or less a consensus that you shouldn't try to memorize kanji readings, and there is debate about whether it makes sense to memorize kanji meanings.


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With so many words to learn, SRS can become overwhelming no matter how efficiently it is set up. I would suggest waiting until you've seen a word at least 2-3 times before committing to spending the time memorizing it. That said, looking it up the first time doesn't hurt, and helps you recognize, the second time around, that you've seen it before.


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More of a comment but I don't have the rep - from time to time I do something similar but I haven't been able to export directly from the app. I take screenshots and then use an image cloze in Anki. It's fairly time consuming because you have to edit the screenshot to blank out your target word, but it's OK if you're not doing hundreds of words. I set Anki ...


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My native language has, thus far, managed to conserve many of its endings. We covered them in the school; maybe there was a couple of hours used on the fancy foreign names they have, but aside from that, no more formal teaching. You should definitely know that the endings exist and have read through them, but I recommend exposure to the language as the ...


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Those words are all formal words and there are some defferences between 陌生 and 不熟悉,顺序 and 秩序. We use all of them in normal life. We usually use 陌生 when we have never seen or known something or somebody before. For example, 陌生人(陌生的人)=stranger, which means i have never seen the man before, he is a totally stranger to me. 不熟悉=unfamiliar, means i know a little, ...


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Rupert Snell's book from the "Teach Yourself" series, Getting Started in Hindi, provides a transliteration for all the Hindi in the book. That said, he also suggests learning Devanagari: Although a roman transliteration is provided for all the Hindi in this book, learning to read and write the Devanagari script is extermely worthwhile. Its phonetic ...


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Not what you want to hear, but I don't think you'll find a good learning tool that doesn't require you to learn the script. I'm not a Hindi learner but I have quite a bit of experience learning other languages that use Indic scripts (mostly Thai), and I've seen quite a few people learn those languages with varying approaches to the script and varying degress ...


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The way I go about learning languages is that I go through whatever material, learning or otherwise, be it a text or a TV show and then decide which pieces of vocabulary, or sometimes grammar points, that come up will make it into my flashcard app. I'm guessing that by "words to study", you mean something similar to flashcards, where you will revisit the ...


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