Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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2

(I'm going to repost the answer I gave for a dulilngo question of similar nature) When you first encounter a foreign language, you also encounter sounds that you are not used to. That your ears aren't used to. At first, someone tells you that you said the word wrong and you get frustrated because you can't even hear the difference. Then you gradually get ...


1

The technique I was speaking of is known as Grimm's Law. From another answer I posted a while back: The main difference between the Germanic languages and the Latin (and Celtic) languages is Grimm's Law, which describes a set of sound changes that map Germanic words to their Latin and Celtic cognates. The Germanic sounds were shifted from their Proto-...


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Depends on the language. For Mandarin Chinese, there are (free online on edx.org) courses based on pinyin, ignoring the Chinese symbols completely. Of course being able to speak, but not being able to read, will severely limit your learning potential - but if might be a valid first step in learning Mandarin. Luckily, some/most Chinese (I heard - I have no ...


0

Assuming you can already understand and express yourself confidently in L2, directly but politely asking the native L2 speaker in L2 to speak L2 could help. I have only tried this once in Spanish and another time in Mandarin, both times successfully. More often, just speaking the language is enough to win over the native speaker. At least in restaurants, ...


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Imagine that the first thing you learn is to memorize written words such as bat, cat, rat, cod, god and dog. Only after you can read and write those words in their entirety do you start to analyze the letters in isolation. In theory, this could work. In my experience teaching Spanish and English, I find it is often easier to memorize entire phrases than ...


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I learned English with paper dictionary before internet. I used two tricks: tape with bookmark where each letter stars, to find word 1 second faster, marking with a pencil dot the word I found. If word has 3 dots, and you still don't remember it, write it down for cramming (but usually second dot is enough). Because searching word has a cost, your brain ...


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