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If anybody happens to visit this site. I would like to share this side-by-side reader that may help you draw your own conclusions: https://ampo0809.github.io/BOMSideBySide/


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Structured study (instructed) followed by practising the new language by using it around the objects that you use on a daily basis (e.g. translating objects in your desk/your favorite book titles) is a proven way. However, learning one language at a time mastering it to a certain level and then starting another language from level 0 will be practical for new ...


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I learned Korean and Thai at the same time and I didn't notice it was faster than learning, say, English by itself. I think it depends on your personal psychology. If you're the type of person who doesn't get disheartened, I would say learn multiple languages at once(But be careful) I'd recommend learning from different language family trees. Say French and ...


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Short answer: yes. Elaborate: Resources: When you use a good Japanese-Japanese dictionary or Takoboto (online or the app) it will take only a second to take note of the accent. You can also hear the correct accent when you use TTS in Anki. In my own experience, even at the beginning you'll notice a few patterns, like that most sino-japanese compounds have ...


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I'd recommend taking multiple approaches. Try not to force it. I see students all the time keeping little dictionaries of handwritten vocabulary. It's not worth the effort. Build your target language in your life. Watch Netflix and Youtube videos in your target language with target subtitles. Read short stories in your target language(novels are often too ...


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