14

If your mind is having trouble with the differences between similar terms, differentiate them by learning them in a separate context. If you race cars, you might not have trouble driving normally, unless your brain can't differentiate the two similar environments. I always found good ways to differentiate two similar things was to learn them in a different ...


11

Here are a few tips that should help avoiding mixing up languages: At the start of a learning session for a specific, listen to some audio in that language. This exposes you to that language's pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary and grammar. The goal is to prime your brain for the rest of the study session. If you use flashcards to study vocabulary (or ...


8

I can sympathize with you; that wonderful frustrated feeling... no thank you! Scientific community's thoughts With regards to language-mixing in children simultaneously learning two languages: "Language mixing refers to the young child's mixing of both languages within the same utterance before the child is really aware of having two languages in its ...


7

I have some experience with the struggle you are describing in your post. My boyfriend with whom I am living is not from an English speaking country, nor am I. As I am not yet proficient in his mother tongue, we use English a lot to communicate. During the first months of our relationship, I could realize how I was adopting his mistakes. So I had to take ...


7

I can't tell you about studies done for this, but it is actually an interesting question. Take Esperanto, for example, a language that has given rise to its very own language learning method(s): La rekta metodo (Cseh-metodo), which uses a method of simple conversation, avoiding text books and the use of one's native language. A film such as Mazi in ...


7

No and definitely no. Are there any studies done to see if the same learning methods can provide different results depending on the language being learnt? The studies wouldn't even be possible. The control group would be like clones of the perfect average human with the perfect stats and preferences for learning a new language. If you do though, the ...


7

I think that you have to first master one of the two and then it will be easier to learn the other.


6

It sounds like you have a much better passive understanding of Czech (reading and listening) than you have in actively speaking or writing the language. You need an immersive environment where Czech is the language that you must use to communicate. Consider taking a trip to or moving to the Czech Republic (and try to stick to speaking in Czech as much as ...


5

I started learning French before I have started learning Spanish. When learning Spanish, I usually could see the similarities between the French word and its Spanish counterpart. I basically used this to learn both faster. I have learnt how to do something in French and then memorised the differences to Spanish. When I forgot something in French, I usually ...


5

Nice question! Ironically, I found myself in the same exact situation as you. I've been learning Spanish in school for about 5 years now, and last year, I began to learn Esperanto. Like you aptly pointed out, Esperanto does seem like a simplified, almost broken, form of Spanish. For me at least, I'd say I'm slightly more experienced than you in Spanish, and ...


4

Linguistic interference or language transfer can work in any direction: from L1 to L2 (or L3), from L2 to L3, from L2 to L1, etc. So your knowledge of Esperanto can transfer to your Spanish, and your knowledge of Spanish can transfer to your Esperanto, both in positive and in negative ways. Knowing a second language is usually seen as an advantage when ...


4

"Immersion" will help any language learner, but is probably particularly useful for someone in your shoes who is "caught" between two similar languages. Then immersion may be the best tool for pulling you in one direction (I presume it's Spanish), than the other. That will help you with the "priming", pronunciation, and "...


4

Learning French and Spanish simultaneously can be both helpful and challenging. There are a large number of words that are similar in both languages. An example is that the word for "cow" is "vache" in French, and "vaca" in Spanish. That's the helpful part. "Learn one version, and you basically learn both." The challenge consists of distinguishing word ...


3

In my interactions with fellow language learners,there are two different types of people. And what to do depends on what type of person you are. The first type of person can keep two languages separate, provided that they are different enough. Examples might be Spanish and German, or better yet, one European language and Chinese. For these people, the two ...


2

My L2 and L3 are similar, will using L2/L3 flashcards increase or reduce the possibility of mixing them up? Regardless of your L2 and L3 (or L1 or LN), using bilingual flash-cards teaches you how to translate between your two languages. Therefore, if your goal is to learn to effectively translate between L2 and L3, you should use flash cards that compare ...


2

Gabriel Wyner (Fluent Forever) recommends avoiding translations in flashcards. Instead, he recommends creating L2-only flashcards for L2, and L3-only flashcards for L3. For concrete things, this is usually easy: find an image for the concept that goes on one side of the flashcard, and the word itself on the other side. However, you should find different ...


2

There are two ways to look at this question: some people may think that there are different learning methods for different languages because not all languages are taught in the same way (i.e. a learner may have experienced different teaching methods for different languages), and methods or techniques to reduce confusion or interference between two languages. ...


2

You are probably mixing up the cause and the action here. Different study methods are applied NOT to the languages you study. Rather, they are applied TO YOU to allow you to master the language quicker, with less effort, on a higher level of proficiency etc. What you are probably asking for is whether there are some adopted practices in teaching specific ...


2

I'm not sure if you are already doing this, but if you learn your next language with your most recent language you'll be improving in the last language and the vocab shouldn't be so confusing because you're using one to learn the other.


2

I studied my second year of French and first year of Spanish during the same calendar year. This was no problem, and was actually quite helpful in learning Spanish because I no longer had to consciously recall basic French vocabulary and the similarities made my first year of Spanish go much easier. But the following year, when I was learning more advanced ...


2

Your knowledge of Spanish will help you understanding French vocabulary in a great deal. It won't help you with French pronunciation nor grammar. Even a thorough knowledge of Norwegian would help you understanding German grammar only at a very basic level. It won't help you at all with German pronunciation, and the Norwegian basic vocabulary is actually ...


2

First, accept that there will be some interference while beginning the new language. It is unavoidable but it diminishes over time. Second, a suggestion that has served me well: study your fourth language using material intended for native speakers of your third language (or second one), and vice versa. That way, you solidify both. You don't have to use that ...


2

I've heard this situation quite a number of times from people learning languages. Mostly they start enthusiastically about say Spanish and they suddenly stumble upon an extraordinarily gripping French TV series and their interest on Spanish's eloquence shifts to the smoothness of French. Hence they give up Spanish for a while and when they start on French, ...


1

I think you need to train your brain to see French and Japanese as two different languages. After saying a sentence in French, immediately say it in Japanese also (and vice versa). This worked for me for Spanish and Italian. When talking to someone in Italian, I would repeat the Spanish equivalent of every sentence in my head immediately after saying it in ...


1

In my experience, it is better to reach at least B2 in one language before attempting one of its close relatives. For example, my Spanish and Mandarin have reached a point where I can dabble in French and Cantonese without confusion. If you must learn two at the same time, try to mentally separate them and use visual aids when possible. For example, make ...


1

Although I am a language learner rather than a native speaker of Danish and Norwegian, I can confidently put forward that there shouldn't be too much interference due to some evidences I have encountered. An online article written by Terri Mapes supports my decision, stating they are the most similar amongst all Scandinavian languages, the differences are ...


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