30

First of all, we need to define what "study" means. A 1/2 year old is certainly studying the world, the movements our mouths make to pronounce words and sounds. The baby doesn't have access to grammar books, but learns by observing and repeating. Babies learn that grammar exist and overregulate what they know - they say "horse" and "horses", "sheep" and "...


24

There are a few reasons why immersion helps you learn a language without you actively trying: You encounter the language more often. When you are immersed in a language, you don't go to class and do homework for a few hours a week, but rather use the language the entire day. You depend on the language to survive—to buy groceries, to talk to employers and ...


15

I guess when you are not a child anymore what you mean by “without studying” is without resorting to a traditional method like reading grammar books or having a teacher. I do think it is possible to attain a certain level of proficiency in a language through immersion. You can use movies or cartoons of course but they are quite unidirectional. It is a ...


11

The linguistics uses the term language acquisition to describe the process of becoming fluent in a given language. This term is selected to address the ambiguity of language studying or language learning. Can one become fluent in a language without (formally) studying it? Of course. Every baby picks up the language of their parents and/or environment he is ...


9

When you're immersed in a language's country, you'll be exposed to not only the language, but also: The culture: an integral part of understanding the language; the language grew or morphed based on the culture. The language, as it's spoken in day-to-day life. Sure, maybe you can introduce yourself, you can describe where you live, what you need, where you ...


9

Speaking on personal authority as someone with an MA in TESOL (Teaching English as a Second/Other Language) you have reached one of the main issues when you say, "I found that there are only a few minutes in a day to get the speaking opportunity". Immersion only works as a language learning technique if you are completely immersed in the target language ...


5

I'm going to say both yes and no Babies don't study with intent. Meaning that they don't know they are studying. They also have nothing to fill their minds except learning how to communicate. People that already speak one language though generally have that language floating in their heads. There minds are full of thoughts and unlike a baby those thoughts ...


5

The Test of Russian as a Foreign Language or TORFL has six levels that are mapped to the six levels of the CEFR. So the Second Level Certificate (TORFL-II) in the TORFL should correspond to B2 in the CEFR. According to the Russian Language Centre in the UK, which also administers TORFL tests, the number of hours of study required to pass TORFL-II is ...


4

I'm not sure such studies exist. There are probably only examples, and there is only one good example that I know of: Daniel Everett is a famous monolingual fieldworker of the type you're asking about ("extreme situations") and is the only linguist in the world fluent in Pirahã. Here he is demonstrating his techniques. Much patience is required. His TED ...


4

I understand your question as "can someone become fluent in a language with almost no (recognizable) effort. In order to answer your question, I have to tell you a story about myself. I'm not gifted at languages at all. It has been always hard to me to learn a language. Especially English has been for me the most difficult one because of not having it at ...


3

Being in-country only helps if you take advantage of it. It's totally possible to be in the target language country but barely learn anything. Thus, you should focus on Korean while in Korea, but it's no problem to study French a little bit each day. You could easily spend 30-60 min on Assimil French while in Korea and still remain immersed (i.e., speak only ...


3

According to me, it's totally possible because an important part of citizens of a country speaks fluently their language without to know its vocabulary. The only thing that we have to do for speaking a language is to connect words with the objects of the reality. The grammar form is brought to us through our entourage (friends, coworkers, etc.)


3

A really good way is movies with subtitles. For example, if you already know English and are trying to learn French, Get a French movie. Watch it with English subtitles. You're already picking up a few words if you're paying attention. Watch the same movie again, this time with French subtitles (same as the audio). If you liked the movie, it's good ...


2

I have a friend who learnt a language entirely by watching T.V. in it when he was young (by young I mean around 5-7 years old). The language was similar to his native language, but it was still impressive. I wouldn't consider this studying at all, since he was watching the T.V. because he enjoyed it, not to learn the language. I'm sure that most people could ...


1

I follow sparsely and comment even more sparsely on the Swedish roleplaying forum at http://www.rollspel.nu/forum Some newspapers or public broadcasting companies have open comments under some or all of their stories; I read https://www.universitetsavisa.no/ (in Norwegian) which has such, though often there are not that many comments. It is also very easy ...


1

All things being equal, it is certainly better to live in-country, but it's not necessary or even guaranteed to help much. I lived in the Middle East for a couple of years and managed to not approach fluency. Why? Because I was taking classes, and all of the classes were in English, all of the assignments were in English, all of my classmates spoke English. ...


1

In my experience, it is better to reach at least B2 in one language before attempting one of its close relatives. For example, my Spanish and Mandarin have reached a point where I can dabble in French and Cantonese without confusion. If you must learn two at the same time, try to mentally separate them and use visual aids when possible. For example, make ...


1

In addition to Christophe Strobbe's answer: because you can dedicate another 60+ hours per week to your study of Russian, as you disclosed in comments, it should be feasible. Consider immersing yourself as much as you can in Russian, 7 days a week. As soon as feasible, find a tandem partner for language exchange (trading your English for Russian), so you ...


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