14

You can't, really As I was learning French (English is my first language) the idea of gender of objects can be difficult to grasp. Genders are pretty much arbitrary and is something you just have to remember with each word (this means remembering it as "une fenêtre" rather than "fenêtre"). You can also always listen for a liaison. But usually when speaking ...


11

The book Fluent Forever introduced me to a simple game (mnemonic) for this exact problem. The author suggests devising a specific, contrasting concept to attach to each gender (or it could be any other mundane grammatical concept with a small number of options). Masculine nouns burn. Feminine nouns are ice cold. Masculine nouns are fast. Feminine nouns are ...


9

I can suggest the following technique: Learn words with word "my": My cat My dog My table My chair I don't know Slovak, but in some other Slavic languages it would work


7

Grammatical gender in French is pretty much arbitrary. There's not much to understand. Sorry. The usual tip when learning a language with (mostly) arbitrary grammatical gender like French or German is to always learn the article with the noun. When you learn the word for car, learn “la voiture” or “une voiture”. I think I the definite article is taught more ...


6

I have learned 2 languages that use gender. First, let me say that native speakers are remarkably patient to non-native speakers for making gender errors. So relax, they will not view you in a bad light for doing so. In fact, they will be pleased that you are making the effort to learn their language. For my first language, when inflecting the word for ...


5

One language where starting with feminine nouns first is common is Latin. Latin nouns are composed of several declensions, the first of which specializes in feminine nouns. Many Latin courses and textbooks cover this first declension first, before introducing other declensions that contain most masculine and neuter nouns. Here's an online course/text from ...


5

I'm not sure if I understand what your experiment consists of. Do you want to check if it's possible to learn a language by learning female forms first? You don't need a special course to do that, simply ignore the male forms as they appear and only pay attention to the female forms. Or do you want to know if it's possible to construct such a course? There ...


4

1) First of all you could learn whole phrases or sentences with enough grammatical context to clarify the gender of the noun. Common ways would be to use pronouns -as @Schullz has already mentioned in his answer- or adjectives. MyLanguages.org gives an example of how in Slovak pronouns and adjectives change to agree with the grammatical gender of the noun: ...


3

One technique I figured out is to memorize them in a romance language (my mother tongue) when the genders in both languages match, and to memorize them in English (L2) when they don't. So I would memorize: - Die Banane (f) = a banana (f); - La fenêtre (f) = a janela (f). But I would memorize: Der Mond (m) = the moon, because moon is feminine in my mother ...


3

I have a Persian-speaking friend, and he has the same issue, because Persian only has a neutral 3rd person singular pronoun. He still makes the mistake occasionally, but in the end it's just practice, practice, practice. I bet there are native English-speaking tutors in Finland that know exactly how to put you through drills that will focus your practice. So ...


2

I'm not sure to understand what you mean by "internalize the gender". Do you mean assimilate it to use the correct gender naturally without thinking about it? This is done using the words again and again in different contexts. It will come naturally with time. As you remarked with the sea and the honey, it can be different for similar words in ...


1

I've been struggling with this in French forever, the advice is to learn the article with the noun which is okay except for the elision which gives you "l'outil" and you have no idea what it is (I made the teacher mad by stating that I only use plurals so everything will be "les"). And for some reason I can't associate "un" or &...


1

It's quite normal in speech to use another pronoun that what the textbook says you "should". For example, if you were talking about a motorbike, it could be das Motorrad, it could be der Töff (dialectal in Switzerland, apparently), and it could even be die Maschine. So it would be quite normal to say "es" at the start of your conversation,...


1

There are a few rules that you can use (similar to German) but they don't cover all nouns. Websites about learning Dutch as a foreign languages sometimes list of few of these, but all of these listings are very incomplete. Below is a sample from longer list that I compiled on my website: The following categories of nouns are neuter: diminutive forms, e.g. ...


1

There is no shortcut. Most or at least a significant portion of the time the gender of a noun simply does not make sense (though in Portuguese, I admit it does make sense most of the time, as opposed to German, for example). You should get used to memorizing the gender of a noun as soon as you learn it, since you'll most likely always use it together with a ...


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