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5

That translations given to prepositions is very misleading. Unlike such parts of speech as nouns, verbs, and adjectives, the prepositions do not have unambiguous translations. Rather they function as grammatical elements, the use of which has to be remembered, as it often idiosyncratic. Moreover, what is relevant to inflected languages, such as German: the ...


4

Matt vs. Japan on YouTube talks about how, even after achieving a high level in Japanese, he had to go back and retrain himself to hear and correctly use pitch accent. His experience won't be 1:1 with what you're working on, but it definitely seems like the last bit of polish in any language will require some deliberate study. The rough map might be -- ...


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Short answer: Knowledge of Spanish would not help much while learning Russian. Long answer: It could be easier for you to learn a second foreign language, but it's impossible to quantify it, as @Tsundoku mentioned. Also individual mileage may vary. If you asked about another language in the Romance group (e.g. Italian, French, etc.) then it would be ...


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I strongly recommend Fowler's Modern English Usage. It is directed towards native speakers but would clearly be accessible to you, and is exactly the sort of book you seem to need.(I'm a native English speaker and I find it enormously helpful). There is a fourth edition of Fowler's now available under the slightly changed title Fowler's Dictionary of Modern ...


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I have witnessed three friends achieve your goal of speaking English perfectly (perfecting their grammar and eliminating their accents). One is Romanian, one is Israeli, and one is Albanian. Quite different backgrounds. One woman, two men. All were adults when I met them. But they all used the same "methodology": They all moved to the USA permanently (two ...


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Since you are only interested in writing the forms correctly, you might want to learn the endings as a short mnemonic, just like one often learns days, months, numbers, etc. You need to memorize "ons, ez, ent". Just learn the sequence however you prefer. When you need to actually write the verbs, you get the sequence from your memory, check which ...


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You learn prepositions in exactly the same way you learn them in English: you read, hear, speak and write them often. This is a horrible and idiosyncratic part of every language (though some express it in some other besides prepositions). Actual textbooks and language courses typically have lots of exercises where you practice precisely what kind of ...


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