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There are two important things about Terry Waltz that you need to know: she teaches Chinese to native speakers of English, so not everything she says about learning Chinese automatically applies to languages closer to English (or closer the native language of pupils or students), and she uses TPRS / Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling, ...


3

It seems like you need to put extra attention into verbs, so I would recommend the following techniques that you might not be using: Mnemonics: You probably know what mnemonics are, but just in case, they are a variety of techniques that assist with memory. A common way to use them with foreign languages is to convert pronunciation of the word you don't ...


1

I know a little bit about what Waltz is talking about. The amount of "distance" from the native language to the learning language is important, as is the amount of cognates present. Other factors include word length (very long or very short words require more repetition since they are harder to fix in auditory memory / harder to distinguish in ...


1

To add on to the answer already posted by K Man, Genki is a good jumping-off point to guide your studies. I would recommend learning just about everything that the first and second books have to offer. Especially while you're just getting the hang of things, I would recommend you find a native Japanese teacher or at least speaker to help you along if at all ...


1

I took a semester of Japanese in college and we did use the infamous Genki textbook. I would recommend taking your time to learn each chapter's content in depth. If the exercises are not sufficient, do a Google search of each Kanji to learn the vocabulary in context. Find an online language partner to practice the dialogs and questions with and try to make ...


1

I can't put together a real answer now, but my guess is that the relevant factor here is not so much L1 vs L2 as the age of the learner. It's well known that age affects how people learn languages; even though the most familiar example of this is that learners who start young have a greater likelihood of eventually acquiring "native-like" accents or grammar, ...


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