33

This is basically a summary of what this website has to say. You are not exposed to natural sounding conversations and sentences (at least, not until very much later as you reach more advanced lessons). In this respect, Duolingo is in dramatic opposition to other language methods such as Assimil, Teach Yourself, or Berlitz. I don’t know how often you use ...


17

Except for the issues already mentioned in the other answers, a big problem of Duolingo is that by grouping words in 'semantic clusters' (e.g. ANIMALS: elephant, lion, snake, horse, cow, mouse, spider etc.*) acquisition of these words is actually made more difficult, due to a phenomenon called 'interference' in psychological research. There is a lay-man's ...


14

It is useful as a supplementary tool. Pros of Duolingo: Good repetition system Words and grammar structures exercises are well organized. They are repeated often enough to make you remember. You will have decent understanding of the language's grammar and have a basic set of vocabulary after a while. (providing you see real language examples outside ...


14

From an official Duolingo developer, This is exactly what it sounds like: our estimate of your fluency in the language you're learning. It is calculated based on what words you know, how important those words are, how well you know them, and how likely you are to forget them. It will increase over time as you learn more words and strengthen your skills, ...


11

Type in what you know, then fail the question. Duolingo uses spaced repetition for your review sessions, so you will tend to get questions involving words you are weak in. In order to do this, Duolingo needs to keep track of how well you know each word. One of the determining factors for word strength is how accurate you are in answering questions ...


9

I actually find the reverse courses very useful. I have worked with the reverse courses in many languages, including Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, German, and Portuguese. Perhaps my experience is different because I am experienced with language learning and have a good sense of how I need to approach learning a language to make it work. Chinese and Japanese ...


9

I suggest that you learn the constructed language called Interslavic. In fact, it would be a service to the community if you learned it well, used it for communication, and then reported the results. Interslavic is a language for communication between Slavs of different nationalities, rooted in centuries of geographical proximity, shared history and ...


9

I am a Duolingo user, currently working on the Spanish course. I do find it to be beneficial, but it does have its limitations. A few that I've noticed are: As has been mentioned, the sentences used are often not very practical or even sensical; how often do I need to tell someone "I am a penguin" or "that is surely my elephant"? However, some may find that ...


8

Quote from "Does Duolingo “Trump” University-Level Language Learning?" by Stephen Krashen: Duolingo is a web-based self-paced language teaching program that guides students step-by-step through a sequence of tasks, largely based on translation. It is clearly aimed at conscious learning Later in the same article: Both Duolingo and most foreign language ...


8

From What does my Fluency Score mean? Fluency measures your mastery of the vocabulary and grammar of a language and your ability to understand and produce the language. Duolingo estimates your fluency based on your progress through the skill tree and the accuracy of your answers. Because learning a language requires repetition, we also take into account how ...


6

Interesting question! I've never thought about using reverse language courses to try to learn a language, so I tried it out. Since I'm fluent in Spanish, I tried out Duolingo's English for Spanish speakers course to see what I could observe. Here are some things I noticed: You'll be seeing a lot of the same words over and over again. For example, for every ...


6

DuoLingo's algorithm records when you use the hover-over hints, and accounts for this in deciding how well you know a word. If you repeatedly check the hint for a word, you'll see it more often, even if you never type it in wrong. I personally find that looking up words repeatedly is one of the best ways to learn them, and one of the reasons why I think ...


6

Duolingo still retains the information about word and skill strength, even if it is not (easily) accessible to users. There are basically three ways of having spaced repetition with the current incarnation of Duolingo. I consider the first to be the most useful, the last the least. The external website duome.eu (previously duolingo.eu) shows the strength of ...


5

Here are three articles that talk about the two apps (1, 2, 3). They are both spaced repetition systems, but here are some key differences: They have a different look and feel, so that is a subjective factor. Tinycards is more modern, while Anki is arguably starting to look dated. Tinycards decks are limited to only 150 cards. This is a problem if you like ...


4

To be honest, personally I don't think Duolingo is useful at all for learning languages. That is, even if it had a Chinese for English speaker course, it wouldn't help you much at all. You'd be best spending your time elsewhere, on a more systematic approach, because it can be a huge timesink with little reward. I finished all Duolingo courses on Spanish, ...


4

So I'll answer this a little more personally. Duolingo is useful in many ways. I used it to learn Esperanto and to refresh my Spanish. A drawback to Duolingo is that it is, at least to me, boring. The same answers and the same questions, over and over again! Do I really have to go through all the animals? Do I really have to repeat "tomatoes", "tomates" ...


3

It's very effective if you use it... Effectively. This sentence seems a joke, but you really need a good method to learn efficiently with Duolingo. Passive learning gives limited results. It depends on your project, your memory type, the language you are learning, the way you are using the site, your habits, and a lot of factor. A person can use the site ...


3

If you do not have a 'Word' tab for your Duolingo Danish course, then either Danish doesn't have one, or you are part of an A/B test and your 'Word' tab is deactivated. What you can do for a workaround is go to the Duolingo Wiki Userscripts page and install the DuoTweak userscript (follow the instructions under "How to install scripts"). Since the recent ...


3

Interesting. I have tried to learn Chinese by use reverse language course. I thought: You can learn that, but it is hard. You need to master Pinyin, but Duolingo will not help it. You cannot practice pronunciation by use Duolingo. So this is not suited for learning Chinese. I think Duolingo is not suited for learning Chinese, because I think Duolingo is ...


3

I've been using Duolingo Kids for a week or three, and have completed the entire course for at least the easiest level, and have been using conventional Duolingo for years on and off. One of the biggest differences between Duolingo Kids and the ordinary app is the lack of translation. Rather than being given a Spanish sentence and being asked to translate ...


2

Can I learn all the languages simultaneously, or should I learn them one by one? Yes, you can. Do you want to learn them all simultaneously? It's easier and I think faster to learn one language first, then learn another after finishing the first. Maybe I should learn the similar languages (like Spanish and Portuguese) together, or do you suggest an order ...


2

I don’t think that there is a maximum number of languages a person can learn in general. Of course, if we are talking about efficiency, quality is better than quantity. Even so, everyone is different and unique and the same goes for their learning speed, in addition to how much time they can spend on learning. As for your question, since you have already ...


2

Duolingo does not have word strengths for Danish. Currently, that feature has only been rolled out to only the most popular languages (Spanish, French, Italian, German, and Portuguese). (Thanks to @Turpidude for the list.)


2

I find it is good for repetition and visual and audio word association but after around the first level it’s just a game. It took me until about then to even realize that there were “tips” on each level - not that they are very helpful in the scheme of things. It no longer corrects accent marks, etc and with the verbal answers as long as you say the last two ...


2

It depends really what you assume to be your weaker subject and your own way of studying. For example, I may learn Present 1 first and Negatives last but if I feel I have more trouble with the earlier subject than the last subject, I would do the earlier one first. People do say that you should relearn the recent ones first though as they are newer and ...


2

Every time I don't know the definition of a word, should I get the definition by clicking on it, or should I simply do my best? In my experience, you must avoid to click, it's better to try to guess, and have the question again, that "cheating". But it depends on your learning project. For a reverse tree for instance, the language seemed hard to me the ...


2

From http://gregreflects.blogspot.com/2014/12/how-to-make-gold-duolingo-tree.html: To Duolingo, strength is about words, not skills. Strong words have a score of 100%, and they decay over time until they reach zero. All words are decaying all the time, but some words decay faster than others. When you hover over word Duolingo algorithm decrease easy ...


1

In addition to excellent @fy12 answer Duolingo is annoyingly picky about spelling. If the course designer decided that the translation of "viro" from Esperanto is "the man", writing "man" is a failing answer. Ignoring optional parts of the answer (like "the") is relatively trivial (compared with all the other functionality), not I'm not sure why it was not ...


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