33

First, I’ll dispute your premise that “Esperanto isn’t spoken natively by any one”. In fact, Esperanto, being by far the most popular constructed language, does have native speakers. People with different first languages who have met through the Esperanto community have bought up children with Esperanto as their first language. In fact, I believe that there ...


16

This is what I used: o kama sona e toki pona! (on Tokipona.net). It's one of the most popular courses, although there are a few points that differ from Sonja's recent book (for example, the use of "e" after "kepeken"). There's also Toki Pona in 76 Lessons (PDF file), but it's been quite a while since I looked through that one; if I recall correctly there ...


15

The main reason people don't succeed to learn a language, is because they get discouraged and stop. Learning a language is often hard, and people don't see results before a lot of time, so they give up. One other problem is fear: one of the best ways to learn a language is to use it in discussions, but people are afraid of their ability, they don't try to ...


14

The main reason why experts recommend learning - or rather teaching - Esperanto is its propaedeutic value, i.e. the value of teaching it before teaching other foreign languages. There has been some research on this topic. Some of it is discussed in What research has been done on the effects of learning Esperanto on acquiring other languages? on Linguistics ...


13

I found this 112 page Toki Pona instructional booklet, covering everything from the alphabet to more advanced concepts, like words for thematic vocabulary or living things. It seems to be one of the most comprehensive guides out there, if you're really into learning Toki Pona. The official Toki Pona website also might be a useful resource, as it includes ...


11

First of all, most people learning dead languages aren't learning to speak, they're learning to study anthropology, literature, history, or some other field that doesn't require speaking the language. Even so, someone may want to learn to speak a dead language, even if it's not directly related to their immediate reason for needing to learn it. And ...


6

There are three surveys that come to mind regarding Klingon: Stefan Annernäs' survey of Klingon-speakers Judith Hermans' follow-up sociolinguistic profile of Klingons-speakers Klingon as linguistic capital by Yens Wahlgren


5

Even in the case of Esperanto it is hard to find good sources, so I doubt there are any such studies about other IALs. In any case, Tazio Carlevaro (1989:179-180) lists three main types of motivations for learning Esperanto, that can be divided into a few subcategories: Motives related to character: "an attitude inclined favorably towards education" Motives ...


5

The most contributed-to resources seem to be the Valyrian Wiki. There are several useful links on the Wiki: the High Valyrian Corpus, the High Valyrian Phonology, the High Valyrian Vocabulary, Valyrian Historical Linguistics, the Astapori Valyrian Phonology, and the Astapori Valyrian Vocabulary page. The Academy of High Valyrian is a twenty-video YouTube ...


4

As I say often to people who ask me why to learn Esperanto, it's like the "Lego" game. Each piece of this language fit together logically. There are only five endings to define a noun (-o), an adjective (-a), an adverb (-e), the plural (-j) and the accusative (-n used on direct objects). For example: rapid-o = speed rapid-a = fast rapid-e = quickly li ...


4

Things have changed in the years following fi12's answer. The Valyrian Wiki (aka. The Tongues of Ice and Fire Wiki)1 is still the main resource. However, David Peterson (DJP) recently uploaded his work on a Reddit AMA. This contains: A Wiki for all his languages "with enough critical mass to release" (this is not yet fully complete, but with time I expect ...


2

The original idea of the auxiliary/planned languages, of which Esperanto is the most successful after 130 years (this July), is to help different cultures (with native languages) to communicate easier. After considering modified Latin, Zamenhof decided to create a fully capable modern expandable language. It is intensively agglutinative and logical that you ...


2

Start with this: European Identity, Zlatko Tisljar Assoc. for European Consciousness Maribor 3/8'11 http://www.debatingeurope.eu/2011/08/03/should-esperanto-be-the-language-of-europe/#.V53JpLh95hF Language is a package (communication part) of cultural (+) IDentity. For cross-cultural communication we need a Neutral language that is not forced by ...


2

There are at least two English language Toki Pona video course on Youtube. I'm pointing you here to the first video of both series: Learn toki pona in a fortnight: Day 1. 12 Days of sona pi toki pona Day One: Reading and Whatnot.


1

Economic reason (at least for Europe) You question is not so far from the one from the Haut conseil de l'éducation. In 2005 François Grin wrote Foreign language teaching as public policy, answering a request by the Haut conseil de l'éducation. This document attempts to answer the following questions: "What foreign languages ought to be taught, for what ...


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