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6

There are two important things about Terry Waltz that you need to know: she teaches Chinese to native speakers of English, so not everything she says about learning Chinese automatically applies to languages closer to English (or closer the native language of pupils or students), and she uses TPRS / Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling, ...


5

In my experience reading has always been easier than listening, but I think that is because the majority of my study comes from text based materials. Practice is definitely required for learning to be able to understand through context clues instead of just by picking up every word, but I also have two suggestions for strategies to target listening practice. ...


4

If you would like to do professional translation in China, companies will often ask that you have an HSK level 6 or higher. I've also seen this requested from companies in Europe (the US tends to ask for its own tests instead of the Chinese HSK), but I also haven't seen it as a "hard requirement" anywhere. If you can advocate for yourself in Chinese ...


4

The HSK6 exam has a very specific, unnatural format, so studying unspecific material (such as native content), while generally helpful, will not target your HSK6 test-taking skills. If you definitely want native material to read, I suggest (a) news articles and opinion pieces at Sina (which are simpler than e.g. CCTV) or from mobile apps such as 看点快报 or 今日头条,...


3

If you want to know the names of the dynasties, there are plenty of rhymes you can find to help you memorize the order and solidify your knowledge of them. I found two that I've mostly translated below, and you can google around each one in English or Chinese to get more details on any of them. I would also recommend trying to see how Chinese people learn ...


3

The way I go about learning languages is that I go through whatever material, learning or otherwise, be it a text or a TV show and then decide which pieces of vocabulary, or sometimes grammar points, that come up will make it into my flashcard app. I'm guessing that by "words to study", you mean something similar to flashcards, where you will revisit the ...


3

My experience is that even after passing HSK4 (1200 words, 1064 characters) with ~90% in the listening and reading part, and now closing in HSK5, I am still not fully comfortable to sitcoms without pausing once in a while (都挺好, 他来了 请闭眼, etc). So most answers relying on HSK word count have to be taken with a grain of salt. HSK will definitely help you, but ...


3

I think it depends on what aspect of the language you're talking about. For reading and writing, English, being a primarily phonetic written language (albeit very irregular), seems to be easier to learn than Chinese. You can see the syllables written out and compare that with other words you already know. You can guess how to write something based on how ...


2

My experience is with giving lectures in Norwegian on a given subject, often with spontaneous interaction with students. I listened to previous video lectures on the subject, wrote outlines of the lectures (and figured out the vocabulary as necessary), and read some Wikipedia articles and similar, if they existed. I verified the pronunciation of certain ...


2

I bought the book 21天征服新HSK六级写作 (the 2015 version), and it contains 8 examples (although each of them seems to exceed the 400 character limit). 女儿的秘密 [pp. 64-65] 无声的婚礼 [pp. 74-75] 国王的爱好 [pp. 84-85] 两张借条 [pp. 102-103] 辞职 [pp. 112-113] 天使的翅膀 [pp. 125-126] 兔子的故事 [pp. 137-138] 两颗钉子 [pp. 150-151] There's also these which seem similar: 北京的符号 [pp.46-47] 游北海 [pp ...


2

I personally think the best way to learn measure words is the way native speakers do: by immersion and repeated exposure, hearing the words used in sentences. If you hear and read lots of the language, you will know what the appropriate measure word is because, by the time you need to use it, you will have heard it hundreds of times. The correct word will ...


2

Students recopy the characters in their notebooks, following specific rules for stroke order. It's a good idea to recopy each characters several times and to pronounce them out loud at the same time (along with the translation) to help with memorization.


1

I recommend that you use the trailer and any other resources you might have to get an idea of what sorts of situations will appear in the movie. From that, you can decide what sort of vocabulary you should look up in advance. For instance, if it's a movie about young love at a university you may want to look up words related to school, romance, or university ...


1

With sitcoms, the difficult with understanding the content has more to do with familiarity of expressions rather than specific characters (it helps but only to an certain extent). Based on my experience with translating and subtitling things like movies and tv series, most of the time it is impossible to translate 'word-for-word' what is being said (for ...


1

With so many words to learn, SRS can become overwhelming no matter how efficiently it is set up. I would suggest waiting until you've seen a word at least 2-3 times before committing to spending the time memorizing it. That said, looking it up the first time doesn't hurt, and helps you recognize, the second time around, that you've seen it before.


1

I know a little bit about what Waltz is talking about. The amount of "distance" from the native language to the learning language is important, as is the amount of cognates present. Other factors include word length (very long or very short words require more repetition since they are harder to fix in auditory memory / harder to distinguish in ...


1

If you want to waste time on the Internet, you can at least do it at Chinese, especially when you're already at HSK 5. Search for Chinese-language keywords on Baidu and Youku. Or, browse Google News and Wikipedia with the language settings in Chinese.


1

There's a reason the books are called e.g. Remembering Simplified Hanzi and not Learning Simplified Hanzi, and these books themselves sometimes make this distinction: ...it is important to note that the best order for learning the characters is by no means the best order for remembering them. Remembering Simplified Hanzi 1 Heisig's method entails ...


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