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I'm trying to learn braille (not yet blind) and decided to start somewhere familiar - the men's restroom (although I could start with physical books, I could not find any at the local public library)

Below is what I could physically see (copied down as accurately as I can, although there may be some mistakes with regards to spacing):

⠄⠬⠑⠄ ⠠⠠⠁⠒⠑⠎⠊⠼

When decoding manually, it came out with nonsense
Using the Wikipedia table, it came out with:

KUC? ??A?ESSI

and using other sources:

'⠬E' ⠠⠠A:ESI⠼

How would I go about decoding the braille string?
(I suspect it may be some form of grade 2 which I am not familiar with)

closed as off-topic by Quill Jul 22 '16 at 22:19

  • This question does not appear to be about language learning, within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Are you looking for a reliable resource for decoding? A program that can teach you to read Braille? – intcreator May 18 '16 at 5:50
  • Are you sure that you haven't copied down the spacing incorrectly? – fi12 Jun 6 '16 at 18:25
  • You mistyped it... – Anthony Pham Jun 11 '16 at 23:21
  • 3
    I'm closing this question as off-topic because it's asking for a method in translating Braille, not about Language Learning concepts. – Quill Jul 22 '16 at 22:19
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Some people have programmed Braille decoders (e.g. the Python program BrailleDecoder on GitHub; I have not tested it).

However, you may want to produce your own Braille output, so you have more materials to learn from. One way to do this is to install OpenOffice or LibreOffice and the open source (and free) extension ODT2Braille. With ODT2braille, you can convert to Braille any text format that is supported by LibreOffice/OpenOffice Writer. ODT2Braille supports various Braille formats (not just for English) and grades (where relevant). At some point in the conversion process, you will have the option to preview the Braille output, so you can then compare the original text with the Braille version. (You will also need to install one of the Braille fonts mentioned on the website.)

(You won't be able to print or emboss the Braille output, unless you have access to a Braille embosser, which is a rather expensive type of equipment... Also, note that ODT2Braille may not work with the most recent versions of LibreOffice and OpenOffice; the extension has not been updated for some time.)

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