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I, for one, do my best to study my new language whenever I can, whether it be crammed into my busy morning or late at night. However, I've heard on several online language learning groups that learning the language in the same room at approximately the same time everyday is more effective than just randomly timed daily practice. Although I'm skeptical to this idea, I'm willing to give it a try. What effects (list both positive and negative) does consistency in time and place of language study have on language learning?

Provide personal experience, credible sources, or published studies in your answer.

  • @Flimzy editing now. – fi12 Apr 27 '16 at 22:32
  • Thanks, much improved. – Flimzy Apr 27 '16 at 22:57
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    I don't think so (my opinion). Assuming you will use that language at different times of the day, why restrict yourself when learning? – user3169 Apr 27 '16 at 23:24
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    Your question would be improved if you summarize the "same room/same time" technique, basically what you "heard on several online language learning groups". Any further explanation, or maybe someone just wrote that? – user3169 Apr 27 '16 at 23:26
  • It means that you learn one day of the week very well, but fail to learn the other days of the week for a while. In my case, it was the Japanese word for "Wednesday". – Andrew Grimm Feb 11 '17 at 23:14
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Memories are built and strengthened by referencing multiple senses. This is obvious in terms of using photographs or other images to learn vocabulary.

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Associating the image of the banana with the word helps to build a more robust memory about the word. Adding the spoken word helps more. Smelling, touching, and tasting the banana helps even further.

Other senses and sensations contribute to building memories, too. The music you listen to while studying will become ingrained with the study material (language related or otherwise). Also, when and where you study can become part of your memory.

If you study your vocabulary every morning during breakfast, then breakfast becomes part of your vocabulary memory.

But how does this affect your actual learning?

By tying your study to specific time, place, or situations, you do strengthen your recall in those situations, but you also weaken them in other situations!

Have you ever studied a word thoroughly, but then been unable to recall it during conversation? Sometimes in this situation, imagining yourself studying can help you recall the word (I've had this experience).

I've heard on several online language learning groups that learning the language in the same room at approximately the same time everyday is more effective than just randomly timed daily practice.

In direct response to the claim you've heard, this can be true, if your goal is simply to pass the test (and you can take the test in the same environment/situation/location where you study).

If, on the other hand, your goal is to recall and use the language in all situations, you'll do much better to vary your study location and habits as much as possible.

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