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Recently I've been consulting a few words in the dictionary and after seeing their phonemic transcription I realized how my pronunciation differed from that of natives. The dictionary may then seem like a pretty good solution for the issue proposed in the title but it isn't - it's boring to go over random words. The best method I can think of is a phonetic reader - a book written solely in IPA symbols, but there aren't many of them out there and so they can't be the definite fix either.

So, in short, I'm in search of resources that can put me in contact with IPA transcriptions of a language - any language -, more often.

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    Depending on what language you are studying, you could use easypronunciation.com/en/ipa-phonetic-transcription-converters to easily create your own IPA texts. For example, you could copy/paste an article into their IPA converter and then read the article that way. – AML Feb 22 at 12:03
  • Do you know why we can trust on the transcriptions given by this website? – Duarte Alfonso Martin Feb 23 at 1:52
  • As I mentioned before, please focus your question on a single language. If someone posts an answer for language A and someone else posts an answer for language B, people voting on answers will be forced to compare apples and oranges. – Christophe Strobbe Feb 24 at 22:40
  • I was unaware of the importance of voting on a particular answer. Can you tell me why we have to say if oranges are better than apples? – Duarte Alfonso Martin Feb 27 at 3:16
  • If people post answers that are all based on the same language, other people can compare them for quality. If people post answers based on different languages, voting will no longer be based on quality but also on other aspects, e.g. preferred languages. – Christophe Strobbe Mar 6 at 18:07

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